Greg Hartle is a man who started over with “ten dollars and a laptop.” Hartle told Glenn Beck on Tuesday he did it as a way to explore “the new world we are entering.”

Coming out of the economic collapse, he explained, many were just “grasping at what to do next.” Hartle had to start over at age 25 after nearly dying of a rare kidney disease, so many were coming to him for help.

“Most of us had been conditioned to live in a world that no longer existed,” Hartle said. “[So] the premise of the project was, if I had to start from scratch, what would I do? What’s possible? What’s out there? Who would I meet? How would I make money? What would I learn? And so that’s what I did. I basically started from scratch.”

Beck said that “75,000 miles and fifty states later, [Hartle is] an amazing, raging success.” Among other things, he is one of the men behind The Unmistakable Creative, which he started with author Srinivas Rao.

Greg Hartle, who started over with "ten dollars and a laptop," appears on the Glenn Beck Program April 29, 2014. (Photo: TheBlaze TV)

Greg Hartle, who started over with “ten dollars and a laptop,” appears on the Glenn Beck Program April 29, 2014. (Photo: TheBlaze TV)

“The way I like to look at it is, we live in a world of diminishing permanents,” Hartle explained. “Most of us grew up in a world that was largely permanent … If we went to school, if we got a job, if we climbed the corporate ladder, if we put money into a retirement account, all those thing would be there for our future. That world is gone.”

But, Hartle said, there are certain skills you can develop that can help ensure your future regardless of the economic circumstances. Foremost among these, he said, are creativity, critical thinking, and the ability to deal with change.

“I fundamentally disagree with the idea that there are certain people who are creative and certain people who aren’t,” he declared. “Creativity is a learned skill that you don’t typically develop, because you’re not taught to develop it. Critical thinking is a learned skill that you don’t typically develop, because you’re not taught how to develop it.”

“If you develop those skills, it doesn’t matter the conditions around you,” he said. “It doesn’t matter the economy. It doesn’t matter the job circumstances. When you can tap into your creativity, and your critical thinking and communication, dealing with uncertainty and change — when you tap into those things, any conditions you can survive and thrive in, and that’s what I’ve seen people do.”

Complimentary Clip from TheBlaze TV

Watch part two of Beck’s interview with Hartle, which aired April 30, below:

Complimentary Clip from TheBlaze TV

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