Former Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner says he was instructed by the Obama White House to say things he didn’t believe on the Sunday morning news shows.

FILE - In this July 25, 2012, file photo, then-Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Two of President Barack Obama’s closest first-term advisers will soon spill insider details on the administration’s handling of the early days of the Great Recession, the White House’s cautious response to the Syrian civil war and the genesis of clandestine talks with Iran. The memoirs from former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Geithner will be the latest installments in an often awkward Washington ritual: one-time confidants signing big book contracts to examine a presidency that is ongoing and policy decisions that still are being implemented. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File) AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File

In this July 25, 2012, file photo, then-Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP)

“I remember during one Roosevelt Room prep session before I appeared on the Sunday shows, I objected when Dan Pfeiffer wanted me to say Social Security didn’t contribute to the deficit. It wasn’t a main driver of our future deficits, but it did contribute. Pfeiffer said the line was a ‘dog whistle’ to the left, a phrase I had never heard before,” Geithner reveals in his new memoir, “Stress Test.”

“He had to explain that the phrase was code to the Democratic base, signaling that we intended to protect Social Security,” he added.

The former Treasury Secretary’s claim comes shortly after declassified White House emails revealed last month that the Obama administration coordinated with National Security Adviser Susan Rice after the 2012 assault on U.S. facilities in Benghazi, Libya, to portray the attacks as being “rooted in [an] Internet video” and not “a broader failure of policy.”

(H/T: Weekly Standard)

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