In addition to lambasting comedian Bill Maher’s atheist activism during a recent visit to TheBlaze’s New York City newsroom, actor Sean Astin explained why his Christian faith doesn’t necessarily impact his decision to take certain acting roles.

Astin described his penchant for using interviews with journalists to openly explore his theological views. But despite having a deep faith, he said that fact doesn’t necessarily mean he’d turn down movie roles simply because they don’t align with Christianity’s traditional moral codes.

“I think it’s problematic when actors lead with their religious beliefs, because I think sometimes it can interrupt peoples’ experience of whatever the dramatic piece is — the comedic piece is,” Astin said.. “I don’t think my Christianity expresses itself in a way that is filtering what I would choose to do as an actor.”

Watch him discuss these issues below:

Astin did say that there are certain movies, like the “Saw” franchise, that would potentially give him pause, as he does consider the overall mission and tone of the movies he stars in. The entertainer said he isn’t quite sure whether he would have acted in such a film.

A far cry from “Saw,” his new film “Moms’ Night Out” is a family-friendly comedy — one that the actor was happy to be a part of. Astin discussed the film in detail, explaining why he believes faith and family films are just now beginning to be given more mainstream attention.

“People are saying more and more that they really feel there were movies out there that reflected their values, having an unapologetic look at middle class America, middle class Christian family,” he told TheBlaze.

Watch Astin talk about “Moms’ Night Out” below:

And here he describes the quirkiest on-set moments, including a potentially embarrassing experience he had on a motorcycle:

Astin also took TheBlaze deep into his faith, describing his views on the Bible and the role Christianity plays in his life. The actor said that he sees his faith as “a very personal thing” and something that helps him feel less alone.

“I really embrace the idea of forgiveness as one of the most important values that humanity can leverage in terms of cultivating progress of any kind,” he said.

Astin views the Bible as a work of literature that has intense personal meaning, though he did not explicitly endorse it as God-ordained, revealed truth:

Delving into politics, Astin, who once campaigned for Hillary Clinton, spoke about the responsibility he feels to be involved in the political realm.

He hosts “Vox Populi,” a weekly radio show, in an effort to “model civil discourse” while helping the public hear two opposing sides of complex social and political issues.

Astin said he hopes to help Americans listen with an open mind so that they can at least understand divergent views:

Stay tuned for Part II of our interview with Astin on Wednesday.