In a recent interview with veteran TV host Larry King, megachurch pastor T.D. Jakes spoke about his Christian views, offering some intriguing analogies to explain how he’s able to have faith in a higher power who he can’t physically touch or see.

“I believe it like I believe I’m in love. I could never prove to you that I’m in love, but I know that I am,” said Jakes, lead pastor at the Potter’s House in Dallas, Texas. “I believe it like I know when I’m in pain. I could never prove to you that I’m in pain, but I know when I am.”

File - In this Aug. 13, 2012 file photo Bishop T.D. Jakes posses for a photo at the Potters House in Dallas. Jakes is bringing his MegaFest inspirational event _ which features everything from a film festival to a conversation with Oprah _ to his home base of Dallas this week. LM Otero/AP

File – In this Aug. 13, 2012 file photo Bishop T.D. Jakes posses for a photo at the Potters House in Dallas. (LM Otero/AP)

The pastor went on to say that “God is the one thing that cannot be proved,” saying that the Lord must be “revealed.” Jakes added that a relationship with God is the most important one a person can have, as he believes the Lord “lives within your heart.”

“I believe it like I believe I’m in love. I could never prove that I’m in love, but I know I am,”
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King and Jakes also discussed racism, with the pastor noting that he doesn’t think conflict over race and related issues “will ever totally go away.”

“It’s not always over black and white, but it’s always over something,” he said. “It’s stupid and it’s ignorant, but that’s part of humanity — and I think that we who are victims of it in any way have to move beyond it and progress and not make changing your heart the goal of my life.”

Jakes reminded viewers that they have “no control over how people think.”

“God is the one thing that cannot be proved.”
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He also said that the government “cannot legislate love.”

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As for President Barack Obama’s health care law, Jakes expressed support for it as a “starting point,” but said he believes critics are right that there are “problems” with the legislation.