Shooters Outpost, a gun shop in Hooksett, New Hampshire, is claiming that it received a “non-renewal of insurance” notice in the mail. Sent by the Massachusetts Bay Insurance Company, the notice states that the shop’s business owners insurance policy will not be renewed when it expires on Sept. 1, 2014.

The reason for non-renewal reads: “INELIGIBLE TENANT “GUN SHOP.”

“You may have heard about some Banks refusing to extend credit to businesses that engage in the sale of firearms,” Shooters Outpost wrote on its Facebook page on Thursday. “Along the same lines, we have just received a non-renewal on our Insurance, from Massachusetts Bay Insurance Company, Worcester MA, because our business, Shooters Outpost, a gun shop, is the tenant of our building!”

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TheBlaze was unable to reach the insurance company after hours on Friday. To be fair, it could turn out that gun shops are no longer eligible for a particular insurance policy, but may be able to choose another.

Further, it was not immediately clear if the company’s “gun shop” policy is just a company policy or the result of federal influence, similar to what is happening with banks as a result of “Operation Choke Point.”

As a result of pressure from the U.S. Department of Justice and the FDIC, some banks have opted to sever ties with certain merchants, including gun retailers, that have been labeled “high risk” by the feds.

As previously reported by TheBlaze, here are some of the gun retailers that claim they have been impacted negatively by the new federal regulations via the Washington Post:

• T.R. Liberti, owner and operator of Top Gun Firearms Training & Supply in Miami, has felt the sting firsthand. Last month, his local bank, BankUnited N.A., dumped his online business from its service. An explanatory email from the bank said: “This letter in no way reflects any derogatory reasons for such action on your behalf. But rather one of industry. Unfortunately your company’s line of business is not commensurate with the industries we work with.”

• Black Rifle Armory in Henderson, Nevada, had its bank accounts frozen this month as the bank tried to determine whether any of Black Rifle’s online transactions were suspicious.

• In 2012, Bank of America suddenly dropped the 12-year account of McMillan Group International, a gun manufacturer in Phoenix, even though the company had a good credit history, the owner said. Gun parts maker American Spirit Arms in Scottsdale, Arizona, received similar treatment by Bank of America, the country’s largest banking institution.

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