After twin tornadoes devastated Pilger, Nebraska, in June, local pastor Terry Makelin told TheBlaze: “Satan and the world can throw whatever they want at us, but even if we die, this is all in Christ’s hands.”

The building of St. John’s Lutheran Church was destroyed in the storm, but the bell tower still stood, and the congregation still showed up on Sunday. Though they lost everything, including baptismal and marriage records, Makelin said, “the building is gone, but the church still stands.”

Pastor Terry Makelin decided to host the service outdoors, knowing his parishioners needed the chance to worship and receive communion after the devastating tornado. (Photo credit: Daniel Bergquist/Flickr)

Pastor Terry Makelin decided to host the service outdoors, knowing his parishioners needed the chance to worship and receive communion after the devastating tornado. (Photo credit: Daniel Bergquist/Flickr)

Americans from across the country drove for hours to assist in the cleanup effort, including employees of Glenn Beck’s charity, Mercury One.

To date, the charity has dispersed over $31,000 in relief money, and has three people on the ground assisting with whatever needs to be done.

“We are here long-term. Long after the cameras have gone, Mercury One will still be here,” Quinn Cotter, the assistant director of Mercury One, told TheBlaze.

Photo credit: Brick Castle Productions

Photo credit: Brick Castle Productions

Beck’s charity, which operates by the motto, “If we want government to do less, we need to do more,” immediately knew it had to be part of the clean-up effort in Pilger, a town that calls itself the “little town too tough to die.”

“We want to give people help and hope,” Cotter said. “This town of under 400 people was devastated. We need to show them that their neighbors care.”

Those who wish to donate to Mercury One’s disaster relief fund can do so here.