Wholesale retailer Costco announced Tuesday evening that they have reversed a decision to remove conservative filmmaker Dinesh D’Souza’s bestselling book from stores, following an outcry from thousands of angry customers.

“Costco is not a book store. Our book shelf space is very limited,” a statement posted on Facebook said. “We exercise discipline in the best utilization of that limited space based solely on what our members are buying. We can’t carry every title that our members are interested in reading. We are constantly monitoring book sales, and make decisions to pull books off the shelves frequently based on sales volume to make room for other titles. Politics or controversy over content do not influence our decisions.”

Costco said in a Facebook post Tuesday evening that they will return Dinesh D’Souza’s bestselling book to stores. (Image source: Shutterstock)

Costco said in a Facebook post Tuesday evening that they will return Dinesh D’Souza’s bestselling book to stores. (Image source: Shutterstock)

“After we made the return, a documentary was released about the book,” the statement continued. “Since then there has been heightened interest by our membership base and brisk sales at locations still in stock.”

“Therefore, we have made the decision to reorder the book,” the Facebook post concluded.

“[W]e have made the decision to reorder the book.”
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On Monday evening, TheBlaze reported that a nationwide “pull-order” had been issued for the book titled, “America: Imagine a World Without Her.”

Thousands of individuals then flooded the retailer’s social media pages expressing outrage over the decision. Some accused Costco of making the decision because of D’Souza’s political views, a claim the retailer has adamantly denied.

“Costco is not influenced by political considerations in selecting product for sale in our warehouses or on Costco.com. This includes our selection of books,” Tuesday’s statement said. “Our book buyers are solely interested in book sales, and do not favor any political persuasion over another.”

The company has maintained that their decision to initially pull the book from shelves was based “solely on the number of copies sold” and “had nothing to do with the content of the book.”

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