A helicopter spotted a large mysterious hole in Siberia Tuesday — and it’s left scientists largely perplexed thus far.

— Scroll down for video —

A massive hole has opened up at the "end of the world" and baffled scientists. (Image source: Screen grab via YouTube)

A massive hole has opened up at the “end of the world” and baffled scientists. (Image source: Screen grab via YouTube)

The massive hole, about 260 feet wide, is located in the Yamal peninsula and can easily fit several helicopters inside the entrance, according to the U.K.’s Independent. It is believed to be about two years old, RT.com reported.

The area’s name, Yamal, translates to “end of the world” and is home to some of Russia’s largest gas reserves.

A massive hole has opened up at the "end of the world" and baffled scientists. (Image source: Screen grab via YouTube)

A massive hole has opened up at the “end of the world” and baffled scientists. (Image source: Screen grab via YouTube)

A massive hole has opened up at the "end of the world" and baffled scientists. (Image source: Screen grab via YouTube)

A massive hole has opened up at the “end of the world” and baffled scientists. (Image source: Screen grab via YouTube)

Initial speculation suggested it may have ben caused by a meteorite, but that has since been ruled out, the Independent reported.

Instead, the edge of the hole reportedly points to a possible past explosion. That theory, however, has not been confirmed by scientists who are currently collecting soil, air and water samples at the site.

A massive hole has opened up at the "end of the world" and baffled scientists. (Image source: Screen grab via YouTube)

A massive hole has opened up at the “end of the world” and baffled scientists. (Image source: Screen grab via YouTube)

The Sub-Arctic Scientific Research Centre’s Anna Kurchatova told the Siberian Times that global warming could be to blame.

She thinks the hole was formed by a mixture of water, salt and gas triggering an underground explosion.

Kurchatova thinks the gas had been stored in the ice beneath the surface and ignited when climate change forced the melting of permafrost, causing an explosion “like popping a champagne bottle.”

Footage of the mysterious hole has now been viewed on YouTube more than 5 million times.

Follow Oliver Darcy (@oliverdarcy) on Twitter