A new video posted on YouTube alleges that a viral video that made the rounds last week of an Israeli airstrike using the “roof knocking” tactic is actually deceptively edited to gin up anti-Israel sentiment.

TheBlaze posted the video Friday after it was originally published by the Gaza news outlet Watania. The point of TheBlaze’s story was simply to show the incredible moment where a bomb allegedly dropped by an F-16 on a Hamas target was actually visible on the screen. But some have used similar videos to criticize Israel for not giving inhabitants inside the structure enough time to evacuate.

Now, a video that closely examines the shadows and the movement of wires says there was much more time between the initial  ”knock” — a smaller projectile dropped on top of the structure that serves as a warning to evacuate — and the big bomb that brought the building down.

(Source: YouTube)

Image source: YouTube

The video was posted by someone going by the username Shelly Dankert. According to the poster, the time it takes the shadows in the video to creep along the building would have to be much longer than the 17 seconds that elapse in the original video. Additionally, the poster claims, if viewers look closely, they can see a wire in the middle of the screen fade and change positions, showing a possible edit by the news outlet.

Watch the eagle-eyed YouTube poster’s video below:

And here’s the original video. The edit appears to take place about 21 seconds in:

According to a CNN interview earlier this month, there is no standard time between the initial “knock” and when the military generally drops the major bomb. It can be “minutes or even hours.”

If the video was edited, it’s unclear why. Was the news outlet trying to make it appear that Israel is not giving inhabitants ample time? Was it simply edited for time?

Further, other sites have questioned why a camera was set up on the target in the first place. Israel is known to make phone calls to and drop leaflets on intended targets to give civilians a chance to flee. Did the Israelis make a call or drop leaflets, which then prompted some in the area to set up a camera to catch the action?

If the video was deceptively edited, it might make sense given the Watania news outlet’s stated mission: “Watania is born from the reality and the concerns of the Palestinian people in order to publicize their worries, and to transfer the fact to the entire world. Using the best technical capabilities and knowledge.”

Watania did not immediately comment to TheBlaze about the editing accusations.

This story has been updated with additional information.

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