When her Twitter account was active, Democratic operative Kathy Groob touted herself as a “business & political consultant, activist for women’s rights and equality, founder of http://ElectWomen.com.”

But after a series of tweets that scores of people are calling racist — along with a public lashing from the Kentucky Democratic Party — Groob’s Twitter account is no more.

Although one might think she should have seen it coming after her repeated references to the ethnicity of Elaine Chao, a former Labor Secretary who just happens to be the wife of Republican U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell, reported WHAS-TV in Louisville.

Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) and his wife Elaine L. Chao arrive at the White House June 7, 2011 in Washington, DC. (Image source: Getty Images)

Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) and his wife Elaine L. Chao arrive at the White House June 7, 2011 in Washington, DC. (Image source: Getty Images)

In the run-up to speeches McConnell and his Democrat opponent for U.S. Senate, Alison Lundergan Grimes, were giving in Fancy Farm, Kentucky, on Saturday, Groob jumped on the ethnicity of McConnell’s wife:

“Hey Mitch, nothing against you wife and spouses should be off limits; since you mentioned, she isn’t from KY, she is Asian.”

Image source: Twitter via WHAS-TV

Image source: Twitter via WHAS-TV

Failing to explain what Asian ethnicity has to do with not being from Kentucky, Groob doubled down: ”Either way, she’s not from KY,” she noted to those questioning her words, “she is Asian and Bush openly touted that.”

Image source: Twitter via WHAS-TV

Image source: Twitter via WHAS-TV

And finally: “Google Elaine Chao, #MitchMcConnell’s wife. No mention of Kentucky, she is Asian.”

Image source: Twitter via WHAS-TV

Image source: Twitter via WHAS-TV

As you might imagine, Groob got socked with denouncements of racism:

And then came the statement from the Twitter account of the Kentucky Democratic Party, which said, “These comments are abhorrent and have no place in Kentucky politics. We strongly denounce them,” WHAS reported.

Groob backpedaled, heading back to Twitter and writing, ”My sincere apologies for poor choice of words,” WHAS added.

Image source: YouTube

Image source: YouTube

Groob reportedly deleted the offending tweets which mentioned Chao’s ethnicity, but WHAS noted that several others about Chao remained, such as: “If Mitch McConnell is going to bring his wife in the race, then her lack of KY status is fair game.”

TheBlaze checked on Groob’s Twitter account Sunday to see if she had additional observations — but it was deleted.

This isn’t the first time Chao’s ethnicity has been attacked by the left.

In 2013, McConnell tore into a liberal group for making light of Chao’s Asian heritage, calling the Twitter messages of Progress Kentucky “racial slurs” and “the ultimate outrage.”

“This woman has the ear of @McConnellPress – she’s his #wife,” the group tweeted. “May explain why your job moved to #China!”

Image source: Twitter

Image source: Twitter

“They will not get away with attacking my wife in this campaign,” McConnell told about 100 home-state supporters at a Republican dinner in Winchester after the controversy erupted.

McConnell said his wife was born in Taiwan and moved to the U.S. as an 8-year-old with her family aboard a freight ship.

“Elaine Chao is just as much an American as any of the rest of them,” McConnell said. “In fact, she had to go through a lot more to become an American.”

And last year’s reaction from Kentucky Democratic Party Chairman Dan Logsdon sounded awfully familiar to party’s statement regarding Groob, as he called Progress Kentucky’s words “deplorable” and that they “have absolutely no place” in Kentucky politics.