Nearly one year after launching the controversial “Jesus Tattoo” billboard campaign in Texas, businessman David Miller is back with a new effort that focuses on remembering Jesus’ death.

Scheduled to launch Wednesday, Miller told KCBD-TV that ”Death Row Jesus“ is intended to showcase that “Christ became the worst criminal in history” when he decided to die for humanity’s sins — and that mankind was undeserving of this selfless act.

“When people think about Jesus, they don’t think about him being on death row, but if you think about what he did when he was on earth, that’s really the experience he had,” he told the outlet.

Image source: Alliance Defending Freedom

The Jesus ad that Miller ran last year (Image source: Alliance Defending Freedom)

A video is scheduled to premiere on digital platforms and venues in cities across the nation Wednesday, featuring Jesus being given the death penalty while other prisoners are see free, according to KCBD-TV.

“They will be very non-traditional messages; they won’t be something you would expect probably from a church,” Miller said of the new “Death Row Jesus” effort.

Miller said hundreds of thousands of dollars have been poured into these campaigns, but he believes that the cost is entirely worth it.

“Corporations spend an enormous amount of money marketing whatever their product is and there is nothing wrong with that,” he told KCBD-TV. “We just think in this case we have a much better product and one that’s everlasting, life-changing and so it’s certainly worthy of whatever we invest in it.”

See a preview of the video below:

KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

News of the new campaign comes as Miller, who runs Little Pencil Ministries, a Christian group, is embroiled in a battle with the Lubbock Independent School District. Officials there denied the display of his tattooed Jesus ad last year and a judge sided with the district; Miller is appealing.

The Christian leader wanted to display his advertisement featuring a tattooed Jesus during high school football games, which the school district rejected back in October 2013.

Claiming that his free speech was being restricted, Miller sued the district earlier this year. The basis for the rejection, officials claimed, was that the ad was a form of proselytizing and that it also violated the district’s open tattoo policy, the Christian Post reported.

Read more about the legal battle here.

(H/T: Christian Post)

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