As officials expected, large waves turned into floodwaters Wednesday along the Southern California shore as Hurricane Marie stirred up the surf from far at sea.

While beachfront property owners didn’t appreciate being were inundated with saltwater as the storm breached oceanfront walls, surfers took advantage of the rougher swells.

A surfer rides a wave Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014, at Venice Beach, Calif. The National Weather Service said beaches stretching 100 miles up the Southern California coast would see large waves and rip currents from the effects of Hurricane Marie. Swimmers and surfers were urged to be aware of the dangerous conditions. (AP/The Orange County Register, Ed Crisostomo)

A surfer rides a wave Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014, at Venice Beach, Calif. The National Weather Service said beaches stretching 100 miles up the Southern California coast would see large waves and rip currents from the effects of Hurricane Marie. Swimmers and surfers were urged to be aware of the dangerous conditions. (AP/The Orange County Register, Ed Crisostomo)

A large crowd gathers to watch surfers and body surfer ride waves at the wedge on Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014 in Newport Beach, Calif. Beach goers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast on Mexico. (AP/Chris Carlson)

A large crowd gathers to watch surfers and body surfer ride waves at the wedge on Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014 in Newport Beach, Calif. Beach goers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast on Mexico. (AP/Chris Carlson)

“This is the stuff that you dream of: rainbows, unicorns, Southern Hemi swells, hurricane swells,” Tim Burnham, who is making a surfing documentary, said.

“You definitely have a healthy amount of fear,” Burnham said. “You know, you don’t want to be stupid. You’re here to push yourself, but at the end of the day you want to go home to your family.”

Surfers Take Advantage of Waves Stirred Up by Hurricane Marie

A surfer wipes out from a large wave at Seal Beach on Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. The National Weather Service said beaches stretching 100 miles up the Southern California coast would see large waves and rip currents. Swimmers and surfers were urged to be aware of the dangerous conditions. (AP Photo/ Nick Ut )

Surfers Take Advantage of Waves Stirred Up by Hurricane Marie

Onlookers standing on a sand berm watch as big waves come into shore from Hurricane Marie in Seal Beach, Calif. on Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. The National Weather Service said beaches stretching 100 miles up the Southern California coast would see large waves and rip currents. Swimmers and surfers were urged to be aware of the dangerous conditions. (AP Photo/ Nick Ut )

Surfers Take Advantage of Waves Stirred Up by Hurricane Marie

A surfer rides a wave at the wedge in Newport Beach, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Southern California beachgoers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast of Mexico. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

Surfers Take Advantage of Waves Stirred Up by Hurricane Marie

A bogieboarder flies over a wave a surfer rides underneath a wave at the wedge in Newport Beach, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Southern California beachgoers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast of Mexico. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

Surfers Take Advantage of Waves Stirred Up by Hurricane Marie

A surfer flies off a wave at the wedge in Newport Beach, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Southern California beachgoers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast of Mexico. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

Surfers Take Advantage of Waves Stirred Up by Hurricane Marie

A bogieboarder rides a wave at the wedge in Newport Beach, Calif., Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. Southern California beachgoers experienced much higher than normal surf, brought on by Hurricane Marie spinning off the coast of Mexico. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

Lifeguards were on hand if help was needed from anyone in the water.

KTLA-TV had footage of one such rescue taking place:

According to KNSD-TV, waves rose up to 25 feet Wednesday morning, which is more than double the typical wave size.

The National Weather Service said beaches stretching 100 miles up the Southern California coast would see large waves and rip currents. Swimmers and surfers were urged to be aware of the dangerous conditions.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Other Must-Read Stories