A video of a guard outside Buckingham Palace clearly delighted his impromptu audience behind the camera, but isn’t sitting well with superiors.

Why?

During his march across the forecourt, the guard — dressed in the iconic red and black uniform and tall bearskin cap — can be seen playing to the laughing crowd with slow-motion and freeze moves, several helpings of a kind of triple pirouette, and what appears to be a concluding gesture acknowledging his audience.

Is the guard giving the crowd a "thumbs up"? (Image source: YouTube)

The guard seems to bend and motion toward his audience. (Image source: YouTube)

One onlooker, apparently a child, can be heard saying during one of the solider’s spins, “That’s really silly.”

Higher-ups couldn’t agree more: A representative for the Ministry of Defence told the Daily Mail they are aware of the clip and have launched an internal investigation: ”Anyone who is found to fall short of the Army’s high standards can expect to face appropriate action.”

The video, posted to YouTube in late August and just coming to light in recent days, was apparently shot during the soldier’s two-hour shift when the queen was away from the palace, the Daily Mail reported.

The outlet said the soldier is part of the army’s Grenadier Guard. Indeed, the white plume sits on the left side of his tall bearskin cap, which signifies the Grenadiers.

Soldiers in this regiment stationed in front of Buckingham Palace are part of the Nijmegen Company, which is “largely focused on public duties and state ceremonial events.” The British Army website notes, however, that a soldier passing out of basic training will be posted to Nijmegen Company for six to nine months in preparation for life the army’s 1st Battalion.

This story has been updated.

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