It Snowed in Hawaii on Christmas Day — and You Can Probably Guess What Some Blamed the Weather On

Mountain peaks on Hawaii’s Big Island received some snow on Christmas — and climate alarmists immediately turned to Twitter to blame it on global warming.

According to ABC News, the snow melted quickly and, thanks to sunny skies, temperatures reached 57 degrees by 8 a.m. local times.

This Tuesday, Dec. 23, 2014 photo shows a dusting of snow on Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii. While snow on the mountains is common, a blizzard with significant accumulation is unusual. (AP Photo/Hawaii Tribune-Herald, Hollyn Johnson)
This Tuesday, Dec. 23, 2014 photo shows a dusting of snow on Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii. While snow on the mountains is common, a blizzard with significant accumulation is unusual. (AP Photo/Hawaii Tribune-Herald, Hollyn Johnson)

Further, such snow is not uncommon for Hawaii, according to Ken Rubin, an assistant professor of geology and geophysics at the University of Hawaii.

“The snow level almost never gets below 9,000 feet in Hawaii during the winter, but since these mountains are taller than 13,600 feet, 13,700 feet and 10,000 feet, respectively, they get dusted with snow a few times a year,” he told the Weather Channel. “It rarely stays on the ground for more than a few days though.”

Nonetheless, individuals could be found on Twitter blaming the storm on climate change.

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