She Was in a Brain-Dead Coma and Her Family Was About to Pull the Plug. The Next Moments Left Them ‘Shaking’ and in ‘Shock.’

Filmmaker Johnny Clark has spent the past few years investigating stories of people who claim that they have died, experienced the afterlife and were resurrected, sharing his fascinating findings through “Project Afterlife,” a new TV show on Destination America.

Clark, who is joined by other investigators on the six-part series that explores the stories of people who claim to have come back from the dead, told The Church Boys podcast about a significant event that he experienced long before “Project Afterlife” was in the works — one that led him to believe that these afterlife claims hold merit.

“I was with one of my co-hosts, Roger Frievalt, and we got a call that a woman named Brandy had overdosed on heroin, and she had been in a brain-dead coma for three days,” Clark explained. “They were keeping her alive with machines and life support.”

Clark said that the family was planning to unplug the clinically dead woman, and that they asked him and Frievalt to come and bless her beforehand; they agreed, but when they reached the hospital room and began praying, he said that something profound happened.

Listen to Clark explain his experience at the 49:30 mark:

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“[We said], ‘Brandy we bless you. Jesus is here and even though this horrible thing with heroin happened, you’re forgiven,'” he recalled saying, noting that the woman’s eyes were lifeless.

But then, Clark said that both he and Frievalt felt something come over them, and they began making commands.

“I looked at her and said, ‘If you know … that Jesus forgives you and he loves you and he’s taken care of you … your son needs you, just reach up and grab my friend Roger’s hand,'” he said. “And I kid you not, all of the sudden she turns and looks me in the eye, she reaches her hand up and grabs Roger’s arm … and we started telling her to get up and, ‘You’re going to be okay.'”

Brandy’s family members, who had left the room to hold a family meeting as Clark and Frievalt were praying over the woman, returned and were absolutely shocked to see Brandy alert and looking around the room.

“Half the family’s shaking, half the family’s in shock,” Clark said. “We stood there speechless.”

Clark, who grew up in a Christian home as the son of two ministers and had heard many similar stories as a child, said that it was a “significant event” for both him and Frievalt, who is a pastor and who co-hosts “Project Afterlife” alongside him.

Three months later, Brandy died of organ failure, but the memory of what unfolded has stuck with Clark, who has been spent the last three years investigating similar stories across America.

It was in 2012 that he and his wife felt an unexplainable urge to move to Boulder, Colorado, where they moved with their two young children without a plan and promptly began work on their documentary entitled, “Deadraiser,” which focuses on the afterlife.

“We wanted to find these stories and present them to the world, because the news was kind of skeptical of sharing these stories,” Clark said. “People were kind of afraid of what people would think if they shared what happened to them.”

Watch one of the stories below:

Now, he’s continuing this work through “Project Afterlife,” which is nearing the end of its first-season run, explaining the difficulties that sometimes surround investigations into death and resurrection.

“How do you constitute death and define what it is?” he rhetorically asked. “Medically, that’s no heart beating, no lungs breathing and no brain activity. So once that happens a doctor can declare someone dead.”

While those are the “best terms” to describe death, Clark said that some will quibble over how long someone was dead before being brought back, debating over what it really means to be “dead, dead” and whether such resurrection experiences can truly be seen as miraculous.

Find out more about “Project Afterlife” here.

Front page image via Shutterstock.com.

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