In 1986, rising American star Donald Trump stepped in to save an ailing family’s farm, and now, that generosity has remerged during the businessman’s 2016 presidential run.

Lenard Dozier Hill, a Georgia farmer who raised soybeans and cotton, committed suicide just minutes before his family’s farm, which had been in the family for more than one century, was set to be foreclosed on and sent to the auction block. But because Hill’s death was a suicide, his life insurance money was unable to pay for the farm.

That’s when Trump, just 39 at the time, stepped in to save the Hill family farm. According to a New York Times story from 1986, Trump heard about the story and phoned the auction house to put up the finances to cover the farm. The report states that Trump offered $20,000 of his own money to help save at least part of the 705 acre farm.

That story of resurfaced Tuesday during a rally in North Augusta, South Carolina. Betsy Sharpe, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hill, explained her family’s story to a large crowd of Trump supporters. She, too, was adorned with a Trump shirt and campaign pin.

“We are very, very thankful and appreciative of [Donald's] generosity to save our family farm,” she said. “What I want you to know is how kind-hearted and caring [Donald] is.”

“He cares about America,” she added, to a loud applause from the crowd. “He cares about farmers, he cares about veterans. He truly wanted to make American great again, and I think if we help him, we can get there.”

The Manhattan mogul currently has huge leads both nationally and in South Carolina, which is the next primary state. A CNN/ORC poll released Tuesday found that Trump has a 22 point lead in the Palmetto State, while a Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday found that Trump has a national lead of 20 points.

(H/T: IJ Review)

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