A photo posted to Snapchat showing two white University of Wisconsin students wearing exfoliating skin care products was mistaken as “racist” – but the school’s chancellor apparently failed to gather all of the facts before issuing a racially charged statement.

“Last night a disturbing racist post that was made to social media was brought to my attention,” University of Wisconsin- Whitewater chancellor Beverly Kopper wrote in a post on the school’s website. “This post was hurtful and destructive to our campus community. While social media can certainly bring about positive change, it can also be a place that deeply hurts and harms others.”

Image source: Screengrab

Image source: Screengrab

Kopper had apparently interpreted the post as students putting on “blackface” before confirming what really happened: The students were taking a picture of themselves cleansing their skin with exfoliating facial masks.

Even after the truth came out, Kopper did not issue an apology.

Instead, she said students who posted the photo should have thought about the implications the image could have.

“There’s policy for everything else on campus except for racial injustice, not just for the black people, but for all minorities,” UW-Whitewater senior Reginald Kirby told WISC-TV. Other incidents of racially-charged posts have been reported at the institution, according to Black Student Union president Radaya Ellis.

“Young ladies using Snapchat to say the n-word multiple times mockingly, or you have someone who still has not been identified write the n-word on a Black student’s page,” Ellis said.

Republican state senator Stephen Nass called the chancellor’s statement a “racial over-reaction” that “misled students, parents and the public by confirming that a racist event had occurred, even though it really hadn’t.”

“Frankly, these are the people responsible for educating our sons and daughters, but they seem incapable of applying reason or common sense,” Nass said, referring to the incident as s a “stark example” of how political correctness has “warped” the mindsets of university administrators.

(H/T: National Review)