A police raid at a Chicago home that sent an 82-year-old grandmother to the hospital was conducted at the wrong address, the woman’s family members claim.

Although the Chicago police maintain that they arrived at the correct address and had sufficient reason to search the home for drugs, the grandmother and her family members are demanding answers for the alarming disruption that sent 82-year-old widow Elizabeth Harrison to the hospital on Friday.

“I always tell my young people, ‘Respect the law,’” Harrison said, according to WLS-TV. “But to have them come in and do what they did to me, something is wrong. Really wrong.

Harrison says that when the officers burst through her front door when she was home alone with their guns drawn and demanded that she “put [her] hands up,” she began to fear for her life.

“At that point, I thought I was having a heart attack. I just started shaking,” Harrison told WBBM-TV. “They damn near killed me.”

When the police noticed Harrison’s reaction, the officers called for an ambulance to rush Harrison to the hospital for treatment of a rapid heart beat, WBBM reported. Harrison and her family members maintain that the name listed on the search warrant is for someone known in the neighborhood who did not live at her address.

“They wanted me to produce this young man that they were looking for. And they would not take no for an answer that I didn’t know him,” Harrison told WLS. ”I have been treated wrong, and I need someone to explain to me why it’s happening to me,” Harrison added, according to WBBM.

After the police searched Harrison’s home and found nothing there, the man the officers were seeking allegedly showed up at the address to inform them of their mistake.

“You all came to the wrong house. I live at 126, and this is 136,” Harrison’s daughter, Linda Channel, said, quoting the man.

“It’s enough to be 82. You don’t need all that other stuff to go with it. Just trying to deal with 82 is enough,” Harrison told WBBM.

Harrison is a retired school teacher who raised 12 children over the last four decades with her late husband.

A Chicago Police Department spokesperson said that based on intelligence, the officers still had reason to search the home, and that this was not a case of an incorrect address, WBBM reported. The police, however, offered to pay for a new front door for Harrison.

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