See What Happens Just Moments After ’60 Minutes Australia’ Crew Arrives in Predominantly Immigrant District of Stockholm

Three weeks after being attacked while filming in a migrant-heavy district of Sweden’s capital, “60 Minutes Australia” has finally aired the footage of the attack.

The crew, upon arriving to the Rinkeby district of Stockholm on March 1, was immediately confronted and attacked by migrants. The area is also known as “Little Mogadishu,” a reference to the high number Somali migrants who live in the area.

According to footage, the crew’s tumultuous day began as a car filled with migrants approached the crew. When the discussion between the crew and the migrants began to get tense, one of the crew’s cameramen was deliberately run over as the car sped off.

In response, lead correspondent Liz Hayes phoned the local police, but even they were reluctant to provide much assistance or guard them for the rest of their time in the area.

“I think it would be better if you go in without us,” a cameraman catches a police officer telling Hayes.

Once the crew entered a local market, they were met with friendly people who agreed to go on camera. But once the police left the location, the migrants became increasingly hostile and unfriendly. That’s when a gang of masked men began to attack the group.

The attack began as one of the masked men launched a stone at the cameraman. That same man then attempted to kick and punch the crew’s boom operator. Then a second man is seen running in, attempting to steal a camera from a still photographer. The confrontation only ends when another migrant intervened by running his mobility scooter into the aggressor.

Following last year’s mass exodus of migrants from the Middle East to Europe, many countries were hard hit with migrant violence, but Sweden has been especially hard hit after the country accepted more than 100,000 migrants in 2015. According to a news report from February, the country is quickly learning that the migrants are not assimilating well, citing more than 20 “no-go” areas in Stockholm alone.

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