Covering Republican front-runner Donald Trump’s presidential campaign has become such a hostile working environment that one major national news outlet has created its own “hostile-environment awareness training” for its journalists who cover the billionaire’s events.

The training, which typically lasts for several days, is usually reserved for journalists heading to war-zones or areas occupied by terrorists. But National Public Radio has sent their political reporters to a 90-minute unique version of the training, according to the Washington Post. NPR aims to teach its reporters how to deal with a campaign that has allegedly become increasingly violent.

The headquarters for National Public Radio, or NPR, are seen in Washington, DC, Sept. 17, 2013. (Getty Images/SAUL LOEB/AFP)

The headquarters for National Public Radio in Washington, D.C. (Getty Images/Saul Loeb/AFP)

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NPR wouldn’t discuss its training in detail, but Michael Oreskes, senior vice president of news, confirmed that the radio and digital news organization has made it available to its reporters. He described it as training for “dangerous or possibly hostile environments.”

A spokeswoman, Isabel Lara, said the sessions are designed to deal “with the stress of covering a very demanding story for a long period of time. We make the training widely available to newsroom staff whether they work internationally or domestically.”

While the news organization did confirm the existence of the program, they did not further comment on how many employees, if any, have taken advantage of the new training.

In recent weeks, violence has become more frequent at Trump’s campaign rallies. One event in Chicago was canceled after riots broke out before the billionaire even arrived to the Windy City. In addition, controversy arose for the campaign after now-former Breitbart News reporter Michelle Fields was allegedly assaulted by Trump’s campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski.

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