User Profile: Dano.50

Dano.50

Member Since: July 15, 2011

Comments

123 To page: Go
  • [8] October 23, 2014 at 2:26pm

    Actually, we DO have the right to bear arms.
    http://www.rkba.ca/
    “Our right to keep and bear arms in our own or the country’s defense comes from exactly the same place as the American one — English Common Law, the English Bill of Rights 1689, the writings of Sir William Blackstone in his Commentaries on English Law, and others. All these laws (and indeed the full body of English Law), became part of Canadian law on our Confederation in 1867 with the affirmation of the British North America (BNA) Act.”
    It’s just been hammered into us for so long that we don’t, that now most simply take it as fact because those in authority would NEVER lie to us.

    Responses (1) +
  • October 16, 2014 at 12:20am

    What Harvard moron came up with that way to put on, and remove a contamination suit and gloves?

    First, put on one set of gloves.

    Then put on the gown or smock, leaving its sleeves on top of the gloves.

    Then put the second set of gloves on, and cover the sleeves with them, maybe even taping to seal.

    To remove the gown, simply grab the gown on each shoulder, and remove to inside out.

    That way, the outer surface of the gown never even touches the surface of the inner gloves, and definitely not your bare hands, as happened when Glenn removed the gloves first, and then the smock.

    The inner gloves SHOULD be 100% clean, the fingers for sure, and and can be safely removed.

    Even with Glenn’s method, the gown should be removed first as there are ways to remove gloves without ever touching your skin.

    Grab one glove by its scruff, not edge, and peel it to inside out, but not off. Then use the fingers of that glove to do the same to the other glove, and to finish it you can work it so you’re never touch contaminated surface.

    Or am I missing something here?

    Responses (1) +
  • [6] October 11, 2014 at 4:21pm

    DLV,

    Actually, they’ve got a lot of land at the same latitudes as Canada, and we manage to feed ourselves just fine.

    It’s just their system that’s held them back and until reading “Stalin” by Cawthorne I never realized how bad.

    The early and mid 1900′s were a horror under Lenin, Stalin, and hundreds of other brutal murdering thugs.

    Lt. Mikhail Petrovich Deviateav is an example of how easy it was to end up in the Gulag. He was a Russian pilot who shot down 9 German planes in WW2 before being shot down, and captured by the Germans. After multiple attempts, he escaped, hijacked a German bomber, and flew back to Russia to get back in the war.

    Since “nobody” could escape a German p.o.w. camp without German help, he was charged as a collaborator and got 12 years in the Gulag.

    Told families would be spared, people confessed to anything, usually under torture, and then families would be executed anyway.

    Check ut, Feliks Dzerzhinsky, Lazar Kaganovitch, Zakovsky, Genrikh Yagoda, Beria, Nikolai Yezhov, Viktor Abakumov, Andrei Zhdanov, and Lavrenty Beria.

    And these were just the top murderers who survived assasination attempts to get to the top.

    The whole Soviet system has been nothing but murder and purges since Lenin and Stalin, so it’s pretty hard to do anything productive.

    Stalin’s purges so weakened his military, that that was a big reason why he cozied up to Hitler to start with.

    And Putin grew up under those influences.

  • [21] October 11, 2014 at 8:57am

    Should check out the zoning laws and such.

    Agenda 21 driven, some places now have rules where, if a structure is more than 50% destroyed, by fire or whatever, it can’t be rebuilt.

    That’s obviously not the case here, but as example of how stupid things are, my cousin lives on an acreage about a mile outside the city limits. Maybe 20 years ago he put in an asphalt pad and covered it with a hanger style tent shed.

    The tent material eventually fell apart, so he cleaned things up, stacked the metal ribs away, and this year decided to erect a new structure over the asphalt.

    The area is completely concealed from the road now, by rows of trees and he’s surrounded by farm land, but…

    Several years ago the city expanded it’s boundary about two miles past his place and the city won’t let him put up a new structure without tons of paperwork for whatever.

    That’s when he started believing me about Agenda 21.

    Responses (1) +
  • [1] October 8, 2014 at 6:07pm

    And one final rant.

    I’ve never understood this, “Nobody can understand the pain this family is going through.” fallacy.

    I’ve been all over the world, and have never met anybody who hasn’t faced some kind of tragedy.

    Everybody’s faced something; a death in the family, a sibling gone bad, a bad accident, a crippling disease, being bullied in school, or whatever.

    It’s a no brainer to say that everybody in the world has faced some kind of tragedy.

    What’s changed, is that we don’t seem to be encouraging people to fight anymore.

    Someone should look up the stat. I can’t remember where I read it, but it was just a week ago. In Holland now, with this “Dying with Dignity” I think it’s 1 in 8 hospital deaths now are patient’s choosing death.

    People are also visiting Switzerland for “Suicide Vacations.” In couples, one spouse may be terminally ill, and the other chooses to die with them instead of living on.

    THAT is where “Dying with Dignity” leads, and it’s scary.

  • October 8, 2014 at 5:47pm

    We are never going to agree because you can’t see the difference between suicide and self sacrifice to benefit others.

    The soldier diving on a grenade to save others is not like a bride jumper. One is a selfless act, the other is a selfish one.

    And pulling the plug on a brain dead person has nothing to do with suicide, and as the brain dead person can’t make a self choice.

    In any battle where you “Accept your fate” there’s a big difference between “Come and get me you miserable *****.” and,”We’re all dead so we may as well quit.”

    Airb0rne suggests you have military background, but if I’m ever facing overwhelming odds, I don’t believe I wouldn’t want you in my foxhole.

    This woman choosing suicide is in no way courageous and her family has NO right to encourage it as right.

    A family’s job is to uplift, to help through hard times, to encourage to live, even if the person never does come around.

    I’ve heard families pulling together when facing tragedy, realizing how precious life is, and getting over petty little squabbles with others.

    Considering suicide as courageous is as bad as congratulating people for having the courage to abort babies with a hereditary disease.

    It’s gotten so bad people are aborting anything but a perfect baby.

    Studies have shown that families growing up with a handicapped sibling have far more empathy on average for others.

    They learn to put someone else ahead of them.

  • [1] October 8, 2014 at 5:16pm

    Oh and one last thing.

    Unfortunately, I’m a clod. Have a hospital record longer than a crack dealer’s rap sheet.

    Anyway.

    I broke my wrist very bad one time. My right hand was pointing back to its own elbow.

    Sat for 14 hours in emergency, and not even given an aspirin for the pain, and not half an hour after I wake up from surgery the doctor said it was such a bad break I’ll never be able to use that hand properly again.

    Told him to blank off, and never went back for physio because of the “negative” attitude.

    Designed my own exercises and now 20 years later I often have to think, “Which wrist did I break again?”

    Doctors are NOT God. They can be wrong.

    And the reason I spent 5 months in a hospital for a different accident was BECAUSE the doctor tried to play God. He wouldn’t listen to 4 different nurses telling him he’d made a bad call about my case.

  • October 8, 2014 at 4:57pm

    Full of hate?

    How do you come to that conclusion?

    I’ve BEEN at death’s door and fought back. And had family encourage me to fight, not to lay back and die.

    When I was in intensive care for a week, tubes coming in and out of every orifice of my body and making a few others, I was the one who managed to make my family laugh.

    Brother-in-law said, “Well if he can do that to us, he obviously ain’t gonna die.”

    Since, I’ve sailed around the world and had one adventure after the other.

    And maybe, JUST MAYBE, if family had “encouraged” me to take the path of least pain, I wouldn’t even be here.

    You sound like someone who would condone suicide. Or give up at the slightest sign of adversity.

    Don’t you pay attention to the news?

    Holland, with its “Die with Dignity” now is rampant with people choosing suicide over life. Many don’t even have terminal diseases. Just a hard fight ahead.

    Instead of being on a “slippery slope” Holland is now on a Double Black Diamond ski run.

  • October 8, 2014 at 4:55pm

    That is not courage. That’s giving up.

    Dying on your feet means you won’t quit fighting. Or you will leap in the jaws of death to protect others. Like soldiers do.

    Dying in bed after fighting hard is NOT dying begging on your knees.

    Suicide in fact, is FAR closer to dying begging on your knees than standing up on your feet and facing that firing squad.

    And besides an accident that nearly took my life, I also faced down a pirate attack where there was apparently NO chance of survival.

    But we did everything we could to buy time, and just as the crew is shaking hands say, “We’ll. We did all we could.” the U.S. Navy shows up in the nick of time and runs the pirates off.

  • October 8, 2014 at 4:48pm

    And you don’t know my life.

    I’ve BEEN at Death’s door.

    And fought back.

    I have EVERY RIGHT to speak about not giving up.

    Obviously you haven’t faced such a decision for your life, because you are here.

  • October 8, 2014 at 4:43pm

    Full of hate?

    How do you come to that conclusion?

    I’ve BEEN at death’s door and fought back. And had family encourage me to fight, not to lay back and die.

    When I was in intensive care for a week, tubes coming in and out of every orifice of my body and making a few others, I was the one who managed to make my family laugh.

    Brother-in-law said, “Well if he can do that to us, he obviously ain’t gonna die.”

    Since, I’ve sailed around the world and had one adventure after the other.

    And maybe, JUST MAYBE, if family had “encouraged” me to take the path of least pain, I wouldn’t even be here.

    You sound like someone who would condone suicide. Or give up at the slightest sign of adversity.

    Don’t you pay attention to the news?

    Holland, with its “Die with Dignity” now is rampant with people choosing suicide over life. Many don’t even have terminal diseases. Just a hard fight ahead.

    Instead of being on a “slippery slope” they are now on a Double Black Diamond ski run.

  • [2] October 8, 2014 at 10:40am

    This is what comes from raising a generations participation trophy winners.

    They don’t know how to rise to a challenge. To fight against overwhelming odds.

    The people who do fight, we hold up as heroes, as inspiration, and while I feel sorry for this woman, I will NEVER admire her for her “courage” because she has none.

    I hope something will change her thinking, but right now all I have for her is pity.

    And if her attitude is indicative of this “Never allowed to lose” generation, then we’ll probably throw up the white flag the instant radical Islam puts boots on our ground.

    Responses (6) +
  • [4] October 5, 2014 at 3:21pm

    That Guy

    Depends what your act of cowardice did.

    Lie converting to become a saboteur, I could accept.

    MAYBE even to save your own skin, as not everybody can make the hard/right choice.

    But if the act of cowardice is something that betrays others to death, torture and/or imprisonment, then the “Better a live coward than dead hero” as worthless as the person who committed it.

  • [16] October 5, 2014 at 3:10pm

    That Guy,

    Well we sure seem to accept some guy high on pot was operating machinery that resulted in an accident or fatality at work.

    And pot users don’t seem to mind their suppliers kill people to get product to market.

    Don’t be such a kettle caller.

  • [4] October 5, 2014 at 12:24am

    Which makes Odumba’s c.p. look even more like a leedle girl.

    Responses (1) +
  • October 2, 2014 at 4:55pm

    I don’t get it.

    In 2000 I sailed from Australia, with Africa as the destination, and was TOLD I had to get vaccinated for Yellow Fever because if I didn’t, and my passport showed I’d been in a country known for Yellow Fever, I would be locked up in quarantine for an entire year returning to North America.

    And there were no Yellow Fever outbreaks anywhere at the time.

    So now you have people coming from Ebola infected countries and you won’t quarantine them for 30 days?

    Beck was right.

    Up is down, wrong is right, and nobody knows their blank from a hole in the ground.

  • [21] September 27, 2014 at 9:09pm

    Part of being able to handle high risk also includes hard training.

    A fast food worker’s training is short and ends, whereas a soldier’s is hard and for his entire career, if he expects to survive it.

    And even then, there’s a greater risk of being crippled for life.

    Only when service industry workers start racking up body counts and parts, will a burger flipper be worth even the greenest soldier.

  • [15] September 27, 2014 at 8:48pm

    Sovereign,

    A fast food worker isn’t risking his life every time he gets you a Big Mac.

    Responses (2) +
  • [87] September 27, 2014 at 2:41pm

    Since high risk equals high reward, soldiers should get top dollar during their service, and those surviving a life time of combat duty should never have to worry about a thing for the rest of their lives.

    When it comes right down to it, soldiers and politicians should swap wage/benefit/retirement plans.

    Responses (6) +
  • [23] September 27, 2014 at 8:43am

    I know several atheists, even have a couple in the family, and except for those two I don’t care to hang around atheist for two reasons.

    First, they’re not only rude, they seem to go out of their way to offend, like that guy with the statue. None of the religious people I know “preach” obnoxiously, so yet without fail an atheist can’t seem to resist calling a religious person a moron.

    Second, every atheist I know has gone through Hell before finally getting their lives together.

    If Penn, of Penn and Teller, wasn’t an example of an atheist who’s never used drugs, (Or even alcohol I think.) I would say Atheism, like Communism, has a 100% success rate of trashing lives.

    Responses (3) +
123 To page: Go