My Patriot Supply

User Profile: Holger Danske

Holger Danske

Member Since: June 17, 2011

Comments

  • June 19, 2014 at 12:52pm

    I’m pretty sure there are a number of people who would find the “C” part of NAACP offensive. They should lose their trade mark and copyright.
    How about “Fighting Irish”? That’s gotta be offensive to someone. And don’t the names Blue Devils and Angels as team names violate liberal understanding of separation of church and [everything else]?

  • April 26, 2014 at 10:48pm

    I know it is common practice to refer to Fox as ‘conservative leaning’, but study after study bench marking the reporting against some objective standard, either the position of members of Congress (Grossclose) or coverage of Presidential elections (Pew, Annenberg) have actually found Fox to be right down the middle. Fox is conservative leaning only compared to the main stream media, and that’s because the main stream media — including CNN according to the objective bench marked studies — is far, far left.

  • April 5, 2014 at 10:28am

    Here’s another measure of whether someone is underpaid — are we having trouble finding people who want to take the job? Judging from our competitive elections, I would say “No”

  • March 29, 2014 at 9:39am

    Exactly Boz. What the VP doesn’t get is that if *everyone* receives the same increase in wages, then the comparative benefits are wiped out and employees will no longer be more loyal, etc., because it is now an entitlement, not a selective benefit. Why we allow fools in DC incapable of running their own lives to make laws and regulations regarding how we should run our lives (but which are curiously never applicable to themselves) I don’t know. Can we just repeal the 16th Amendment, turn off the money spigot, and be done with this?

  • March 28, 2014 at 8:31am

    Kobe — he’s the one that skipped college and went straight to the NBA from high school, right? That would explain his relatively higher level of enlightenment.

  • February 18, 2014 at 10:59pm

    Just to be clear: While Beckel is completely off on any sort of causal relationship between current attitudes toward unionization and any storied Nazi (NSDAP) history, he is right that there is a history there. The “V” in VW is for “‘Volk” or “people”, which was the socialist component of the Nazi agenda (the “S” in NSDAP, as well as the “A”, which is for “Arbeiter” or “worker”). So thanks, Beckel, for reminding us that the Nazis were socialists…

    Responses (1) +
  • November 28, 2013 at 12:50am

    Exactly, trolltrainer. This is just like the Dalai Lama’s support for socialism. The issue is that both the pope and the Dalai Lama assume intentions are the most important driver of action. And selfless motivation is optimal for your soul. Unfortunately, assuming selflessness in the present world is worse than folly, it is destructive. But these are not the trains of thought that our spiritual leaders travel on.

  • March 9, 2013 at 8:45am

    One thing that did strike me during the filibuster was how respectful Senator Paul was at all times. My own Senator (Cruz) was clearly more willing to take a partisan position, but Paul debated the issue only and did not attack any individuals. A class act. I am sorry Senator McCain was incapable of acting with the same level of decency.

  • February 15, 2013 at 12:25pm

    If you ignore the data, discourage others from collecting data, and listen only to statist ideology, then the chief is correct. However, if you actually look at the data as a study did almost 30 years ago now (Gary Kleck 1988 in the journal “Social Problems”), you find that in a given year:

    * 1500-2800 felons were legally killed by gun-wielding civilians
    * 8700-16000 felons were non-fatally wounded
    * Guns were used defensively about 1 million times.

    I would suggest that we collect data to update these figures, but I’m sure there would be all sorts of efforts to keep that kind of information from getting out … because it doesn’t help the statist cause.

  • January 29, 2013 at 12:29pm

    Reminds me of this classic scene from Mel Brooks’ History of the World Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dk47saogI8o.

    “They are my people, I am their sovereign. I love my people. Pull.”

  • January 29, 2013 at 12:07pm

    The Constitution says that Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof. It says nothing about “unless it is for profit.”

  • January 21, 2013 at 6:20pm

    Regarding Straw Man #7 — besides, it is not the effort that counts, it is the performance. If a person, regardless of the color of their skin, their gender, their age, etc., is able to get the job done twice as well as me in half the time, they should get paid twice what I get paid. That’s true even if I worked really hard at it.

  • January 5, 2013 at 5:59pm

    The mother is a hero, but this is far from rare. As any reader of NRA’s “First Freedom” can attest to, guns are used to protect citizens with great regularity. Moreover, as (former liberal professor) Gary Kleck’s classic and still relevant 1988 article “Crime Control Through the Private Use of Armed Force” (Social Problems, Vol 35, No 1 for those wishing to look it up) this illustrates why burglary is less frequent in the US than in “gun free” countries like the UK and more specifically, why burglars avoid breaking and entering when people are in their homes in the US to a far, far greater degree than in the UK, where there is no threat of immediate punishment.

  • December 28, 2012 at 10:37am

    Whether or not we can compare the lessons from Britain and Australia to the U.S. remains to be seen. However, the stats presented in the article are certainly better than the usual misinformation presented by activists, members of Congress, and your average journalist. As you note, there are a myriad factors that make cross-national comparisons bogus. Which is why it is helpful to examine “natural experiments” holding as many things constant as possible (for example by focusing on just within a country) and varying only one thing — in this case passage of gun laws. On this account, examining outcomes in Britain and Australia is very relevant. It is, however, completely flawed to point to gun crimes between countries (so comparing gun violence in Australia and the U.S., Denmark and the U.S., etc.) as there are way too many intervening variables. One major factor that is invariably ignored is cultural homogeneity. By definition, this is impossible to achieve in a nation of immigrants. While this will result in conflict, it also breeds genius and innovation, making the U.S. the great country that it is.

  • July 26, 2012 at 10:24am

    You left out “unexpectedly”. The revision will be unexpected once again…

  • July 7, 2012 at 9:29am

    This was obviously satirical, but it does highlight an important point: Why does Toure think that these things would be good for the nation? Two years of national service — presumably it teaches some valuable skills in terms of showing up for work, learning to take orders, being dedicated, acquiring a diversity of skills, etc. But why have we lost this? Because the very same government has priced and regulated kids out of the market. While the minimum wage law was well-intended, hiking it by 40 percent (by a Dem Congress and Pres Bush) effectively removed the youth from the labor force. Further regulating what kids under 18 are allowed to do eliminates them from those experiences. Again, well-intentioned, but without any thought about unintended consequences. If they just stopped to think about the unintended consequences of these absurd new mandates, we would be a good deal better off today.

  • May 21, 2012 at 1:21pm

    And good for the parents for teaching the kids. Seems like those parents ended up enriching the education of a whole class, not just their own kid.

  • May 21, 2012 at 1:20pm

    Wow. That teacher just made President Obama King of Thailand or the Prophet Muhammed. Because it really is illegal to speak negatively of the King and the Prophet (though not in the US). I guess she must have gotten confused while reading all those social studies books.

  • April 22, 2012 at 12:03am

    I’m embarrassed to admit it, but I once thought the same way. It is the dominant mindset in Scandinavia (where I grew up). It’s a little hard to explain because it is not rooted in rationalism, but I’ll try: It goes back to a principle that people who do better than others should never be allowed to think that they ARE better in any way. Doing better than others is merely chance, happenstance. If you can bring yourself around to believing this, then it becomes possible to conclude that it is fair to disproportionately punish those who do better than others (regardless of the effort or chances they had to take to get there).

    Interestingly, it is also the case in Scandinavia (as it is here) that Social Democrats (approximately equivalent to an American communist from a policy perspective) and leftists generally are curiously entitled to thinking that they are better, but only because they represent a fictional “the people”. People in the center, the right or merely apolitical may never put on airs.

    Responses (2) +
  • April 12, 2012 at 7:00pm

    I still can’t figure out how making some people more more in taxes results in or is linked to everyone getting a fair shot.