User Profile: SkepticsAmongUs

SkepticsAmongUs

Member Since: March 26, 2013

Comments

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  • December 12, 2014 at 10:05am

    You should think a little more critically before you post something like this. I could just as easily quote other medical diagnoses that are almost exclusive to heterosexual intercourse. For instance, HPV is most commonly spread during vag inal or anal sex. 90% of cervical cancer cases are caused by the HPV virus. More than 10,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer each year. This means straight people having sex causes 10,000 women to obtain cervical cancer.
    Now that’s healthy…Seems normal to me… Dope.

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  • [2] December 12, 2014 at 9:56am

    Most important to this conversation is that this organization is completely dishonest. The man in the poster, Kyle Roux, is not a twin. He is also an openly gay man, and thinks the billboard is discriminatory. Well done….well done.

    http://www.nbc12.com/story/27608187/openly-gay-model-in-nobody-is-born-gay-billboard-reacts?clienttype=generic&mobilecgbypass

  • [1] September 2, 2014 at 10:30am

    @ Disabledcovetern
    I assume you are speaking of the photograph by Andres Serrano at the 1987 Awards in Visual Arts competition? That’s a very vague reference, but Ill bite.

    I am unequivocally against governmental funding for religious imagery, and against religious imagery being displayed on public grounds. That means I would be squarely against the governmental funding of pisschrist, or the display of this cross in Indiana. I assume that most Atheists would be consistent in this stance.

    On a more interesting note, I believe Andres Serrano’s work really displayed the intolerance of the many christians. Serrano received death threats and hate mail for his work. When the photo was moved to the National Gallery of Victoria, the gallery officials received death threats and the art was vandalized. I must have missed the place in this article where atheists were sending death threats to the artist vandalizing the sculpture…

  • [4] September 2, 2014 at 9:45am

    “Hey Atheists, if you want to attack religon…GO TO A DAMN MOSQUE AND TRY THAT!”

    Your rant is ridiculous. Atheists respect your right to practice your religion within your home, religious building, and almost anywhere at all. We would never “Go to a damn mosque” and ask them to remove religious imagery. If there was Muslim religious imagery in the public square, as is the case with this cross, I would be right there calling for its removal. But, I’m sure the christian right would beat the atheists to the punch, and cry about how muslim imagery shouldn’t be in the public square before any atheist even had a chance to speak up.

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  • [2] August 21, 2014 at 10:23am

    It’s nice to see the original pledge of allegiance again, before it was bastardized during the red scare.

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  • [-1] May 20, 2014 at 9:43am

    CLAP CLAP CLAP. This is the post I was looking for. Conservatives cry about how liberals over-react and attack people for their opinion on race or gay marriage, but are just as quick to attack and destroy anyone who falls out of line.

  • [-3] May 16, 2014 at 10:20am

    Bwahahaha. Please go bankrupt Glenn. That would be amazing.

  • [-2] May 8, 2014 at 11:02am

    Sorry, but you dont know the end result (I assume you are speaking of the rapture). All generations of believers before you thought the rapture would come during their lifetime, and they were all incorrect.

    “”Truly I tell you, this generation will certainly not pass away until all these things have happened.”
    ~Luke 21:32

  • [-4] May 8, 2014 at 10:58am

    May be I am one of the few “liberals” who is consistent, but I believe that these CEO’s, NBA owners, HGTV show hosts, etc.. should NOT be fired from their jobs. I think they should be free to say what they believe, even though I dont agree with them.

    Then, as a consumer, if I disagree with something I will not use or buy their product. I dont go to chick-fil-a anymore, I dont go to Hobby Lobby, I wouldn’t buy Clippers gear if I were a Clippers fan, and I wouldn’t watch these shows if they were on HGTV.

    I believe in personal liberties no matter what the circumstance. Sadly, like I said before, tea party people and the christian right are mostly hypocrites when it comes to personal liberties. Small government and personal liberties are a huge talking point until gay marriage or abortion come up. Then, these hypocrites cant wait to pry in to peoples personal lives.

    Responses (1) +
  • [-9] May 8, 2014 at 9:48am

    The hypocrisy of the christian right and tea party. They want smaller government and for government to stay out of their personal lives…unless their personal lives include an abortion or a gay wedding. Hypocrites.

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  • May 7, 2014 at 9:20am

    The institution of Sharia Law in Brunei further highlights the need for separation of church and state within all countries. If there is no separation, and religious zealots are in control, their religious intolerance shines through.

    “The Southeast Asian nation has been in the headlines of late over the phasing in of new Islamic laws that will enact harsh punishments for homosexuality, abortions and adultery.”
    If given the opportunity, many fundamentalist christians in the US would like harsh punishments for the above as well.

  • [1] May 1, 2014 at 9:17am

    Impossible, the earth is only 6000 years old!
    ~Ken Hamm

  • April 21, 2014 at 11:21am

    @Bad_Ashe
    “We can also quite accurately say that it was the overwhelmingly Christian culture of the United States that directed and navigated American ascendancy.”
    This is a blind assertion that blindly gives Christianity the credit for the drive and determination of the american people. As such, that which is asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence.

    “Your non-belief in the existence of hell has nothing to do with its actual existence, therefore the threat isn’t empty.”
    I choose to believe in things based on demonstrable, repeatable evidence. If you believe in hell, then your requirement for evidence is lacking. This does not come as a surprise, because your statement above would hold true for any mythical creature. “Your non-belief in the existence of unicorns has nothing to do with its actual existence”. Sure it does. Without evidence for it (unicorns or hell), the likelihood for its existence are infinitely small. As such, the threat of hell remains an empty one.

    “it would be disingenuous and intellectually dishonest to completely separate the two. Of course, I expect intellectual dishonestly from atheist trolls, so no surprise there.”
    I never said the two were completely separate. He asserted that “this IS a christian nation”, and I said that this simply is not true (and you agreed). If you weren’t so eager to take a shot at me, you may have noticed. Sounds like you are the intellectually dishonest one.

  • April 21, 2014 at 10:30am

    Atheism is not a religion. There is no dogma, no holy book, no higher power, and especially no faith. It is a single position on a single postulate from the believer, to which the atheist remains skeptical and takes the null position.

    Atheists are finally standing up to prevent government entities from showing preference of one religion over another. Or by showing preference to one religion over non-religion. If you don’t understand how the establishment clause has been interpreted, I suggest you educate yourself on the Everson v Board of Education case and its application of the 14th Amendment.

  • April 21, 2014 at 10:19am

    Simply not true. Your history teachers must have failed you.

    As an aside…atheists dont believe in a hell, so your threat is an empty one.

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  • April 2, 2014 at 10:06am

    @fortherecord
    Honestly, I have no idea what you are talking about. Let me first make this clear. The idea of being an atheist is a singular position on a singular topic posited by the believer. Beyond this one position on this one topic, Atheists will likely differ on any other topic.

    For instance, I am generally against the death penalty. So, I wouldn’t call for the death of anyone. I agree that animals should be respected, but I understand that humans are omnivores, and therefore have an innate desire to eat meat.

    So sure, in no uncertain terms, I am against the “slow torturing to death” of people that abuse or have been accused of abusing animals. Happy?

  • April 2, 2014 at 9:46am

    Oh Stuntbrain. I was a fan of yours back when you used to come on O&A. I know you are a very smart guy, so maybe you should pass this message on to your editors then.

    It is in poor taste to assert that a positive result after a tragedy a miracle. This is a small, inconsequential story, but oftentimes christian symbolism after a tragedy has been considered a miracle. People considered the 911 cross to be a miracle. More recently, people considered the bible found in the Harlem fire to be a miracle. Innocent people died in these situation; mothers with unborn children. If your God is omnipotent/omnibenevolent/and omniscient, he either allowed these atrocities to occur and did nothing, or had an active hand in their occurrence. To turn around and consider a metal cross or finding a bible a miracle is insensitive as best.

    I would believe in miracles if there were verifiable and demonstrable proof for one. To you, a miracle is just a feeling. You feel like an unlikely occurrence has some deeper meaning and is tied to some sort of higher power. For the believer, the verifiable evidence is not a prerequisite for belief, belief is a prerequisite for belief. To me, the claim of a miracle is just as unlikely as a claim for a yeti or the lochness monster. The evidence must be demonstrable, verifiable, and repeatable. I would hope as a generally smart person, that you would hold the assertion a miracle to the same standards as you would other claims.

  • April 2, 2014 at 9:18am

    Belief in anything without proper evidence, and telling others to do the same, reeks of pride. I am proud to be an atheist, and it is freeing. I do charitable things and act morally in this world because it helps people in need and helps the community. I act morally on my own volition, not based on some fear from some cosmic entity.

    “There is nothing to be gained and everything is lost when one brags about not believing in GOD.”
    This is patently false. Please inform yourself on Pascals Wager.

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  • April 2, 2014 at 8:58am

    Miracle: an unusual or wonderful event that is believed to be caused by the power of God.

    Im glad this guy is ok, but Mike Opelka is a dope for using this headline. Was it a miracle when the chainsaw sliced through his neck, or only when it was removed? Try to give a little more credit to the wonderful medical staff, rather than the all-powerful entity that would have allowed the injury to happen in the first place.

    Responses (5) +
  • March 28, 2014 at 1:55pm

    My Sacred Honor
    Oh no! Lets not start this up again. Judicial precedence has held that the 14th Amendment applies to cases about the Establishment Clause (see Everson v. Board of Education). This basically extends the requirements of the Establishment Clause to the State level, which trickles down to the Municipal level.

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