User Profile: U4eeeahhh

U4eeeahhh

Member Since: October 29, 2012

Comments

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  • [-1] August 17, 2014 at 2:29pm

    @jblaze, Perry has no authority to discharge or discipline any county elected official for any misdemeanor. She is not running for reelection.

  • August 17, 2014 at 2:25pm

    Texas was once a Democrat-dominated state and it looks to be headed back that way. Wanna bet they get a woman Democrat Governor next? Liberal Texas is not just Austin anymore either, it’s San Antonio, it’s Houston and many of the small revitalized towns around the Hill Country. Perry, Cruz and old Corny rely on statewide votes to get support for their backward conservative policies. Population shifts to urban and younger voters plus the realization of the negative effects that the GOP rule has wrought on Texans are bringing change in the Lone Star State. There’s a backlash acomin’ and it’s gonna sting.

  • [-1] August 17, 2014 at 2:21pm

    any comments are in error simply because you are not from Texas. You must recognize the differences in Texas law. The indictment is valid based on Texas law. Probably is different from laws where y’all live.
    The problem is that she was not Perry’s to fire, Gov. GoodHair was not her employer. She is an elected official – not in a Perry controlled office, her’s is a County office, not under state control. Perry attempted to coerce an elected official to resign who he could not fire by withholding approved funds unless she acquiesced. That is a pretty clear violation of Texas law. No law in Texas requires termination or allows for removal of any elected official for a misdemeanor. There is no legal manner to fire her, the Travis Country Board can’t fire her, she is in an elected office. Under Texas law, the Governor would appoint the replacement should the DA’s office be open. Most in Travis County do NOT want a Perry appointed DA. One poll shows that Lehmberg would be reelected if she ran for office now. No law in Texas requires her to resign, none!

  • [-1] August 17, 2014 at 9:16am

    Look, I’m as anti-Perry as anyone but the historic name of a ranch has nothing to do with the character of Rick Perry. Lowest of all possible cheap shots to even mention it.

    Now the “Three Agencies I’ll Close” debate performance on the other hand clearly demonstrates Perry is a puppet who can’t remember his lines very well.

  • August 17, 2014 at 9:08am

    Because Perry made his approval of the funding contingent upon Lehmberg resigning. Under Texas law that is a clear abuse of power. She is an elected county official, not under his jurisdiction. Her only boss are the voters of Travis County, Texas.

    In Texas should she resign, Perry appoints the replacement and that is the real ball in play here
    Rick wants a DA from his team.

  • [1] August 17, 2014 at 8:58am

    No law in Texas requires termination or allows for removal of any elected official for a misdemeanor. There is no legal manner to fire her.
    Perry attempted to coerce an elected official to resign who he could not fire by withholding approved funds unless she acquiesced. That is a pretty clear violation of Texas law.

    Nor can the Travis Country Board fire her, she is elected. You could try for a recall election, but that is the only legal recourse under Texas law.

  • August 17, 2014 at 8:49am

    Many comments are in error simply because you are not from Texas. You must recognize the differences in Texas law. The indictment is valid based on Texas law. Probably is different from laws where y’all live.

    The problem is that she was not Perry’s to fire, Gov. GoodHair was not her employer. She is an elected official – not in a a Perry controlled office, her’s is a County office, not under state control. He tried to force a Travis County independent political body to act in a manner they were not disposed to follow. Under Texas law, the Governor would appoint the replacement should the DA’s office be open. Most in Travis County do NOT want a Perry appointed DA. One poll shows that Lehmberg would be reelected if she ran for office now. No law in Texas requires her to resign, none!

    Rick’s stupid arrogance has reared its ugly head and bit him on the a**

    Texas was once a Democrat-dominated state and it looks to be headed back that way. Wanna bet they get a woman, democrat Governor next? Liberal Texas is not just Austin, it’s San Antonio, it’s Houston and many of the small revitalized towns around the Hill Country. Perry, Cruz and old Corny rely on statewide votes to get support for their backward conservative policies. Population shifts to urban and younger voters and realization of the negative effects the GOP rule has wrought are bringing change in the Lone State State. There’s a backlash a’comin and it’s gonna sting.

  • [1] August 16, 2014 at 11:02am

    “Atheists are satan worshipers ” That’s just silly, because Atheists don’t believe in your “good” God, you’re sure they believe in the “bad” God. No God, means no good god and no bad god too. What part of “None” do you not get?

    If the Religious did not try to get Government to enforce secular regulations based on their superstitions, the non-believers would be able to blissfully ignore the intellectually challenged posteriors of faith.

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  • [1] August 16, 2014 at 10:53am

    I’m from a unusual background, my ancestors were run out Sweden and then Germany in the 1840′s because they were Freethinkers, a precursor to today’s Atheists. They immigrated to America, arriving in Baltimore in 1846 and making their way to the Texas Hill Country by 1848 were they founded Comfort and kept churches out of their Freethinker community for the first 49 years. They came to America, these Swedish, German and Czech immigrants for Freedom FROM Religion. I know that my father, his father, my great grandfather and his father, the one who left Sweden after refusing to pay Church Tax, were all life long Atheists. So I am relatively rare in that I was never indoctrinated into the delusions of faith. Never christened or baptized. I’m not a former anything.

    You want to know how I view Religion? All religion is nothing more than superstitions based on myths and legends. irrational reactions to inaccurate and unscientific information.
    and to get to my point…
    Hitler was superstitious, from his hate for Jews to his beliefs in magical forces. Stalin certainly was too. Regarding Mao – Confucians follow a philosophy, not a deity. Confucians are all Atheists, Mai switch philosophies, he never worshiped a God. Kim Il-Sung was a Deity himself, hardly an Atheist. The Juche religion worships Kim Il-Sung. You really know very little about religion or history do you?

  • [2] August 16, 2014 at 10:16am

    Look at it like substance abuse, the Moderate Faithful are Enablers for the Radical – Christian, Jew or Muslim.

    Your assumptive statistical analysis of the planet’s religiosity is grossly in error. 55% of the planet’s sentient life forms self-identify as Christian, Jew or Muslim. They are the single god believers – that capital “G” supreme being type god. 55%, that is 40% less than your claim of 95%.

    15% of the beings on this rock in space are Hindus, they have deities but not the single supreme being like the C-J-M group.

    Buddhists, various non-deity Folk Religions and Nones make up about 30% of the Earth’s population and that number is growing rapidly. That six times as many Non-God followers as you suggested were only 5%.

    In all areas except Africa, “None” is the fastest growing group in all faith surveys. Look at Japan, 80% of the Japanese tell pollsters they do not consider themselves believers in any religion, 1% identify as Christian and Shinto/Buddhism is the only visible religion and that’s ancestor worship. 20% of Americans are Nones, 35% of Millennials. In the 2010 Eurobarometer Poll only 51% of Europeans [EU27] said they believe in a God.

    To answer your question correctly: How many believe in God? Maybe 50% and that’s trending downward daily, and that’s a good thing.

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  • [-1] August 16, 2014 at 9:24am

    Gracie, all programming has to be “encouraging or good” by your standards? Some adults are open to a more realistic look are the world.

    From 1930 to 1967 movies were censored based on the “Hays Code”. Look it up. It was an invasive, restrictive set of rules on how crime, drugs, sex and liquor could be portrayed in movies. I think you might like a return to that oppressive system.
    [edited version]

  • [-1] August 16, 2014 at 9:23am

    Gracie, all programming has to be “encouraging or good” by your standards? Some adults are open to a more realistic look are the world.

    From 1930 to 1967 movies were censored based in the “Hays Code”. Look it up. It was an invasive, restrictive set of riles on how crime, drugs, sex and liquor could be portrayed in movies. I think you might like a return to that oppressive system.

    Responses (1) +
  • August 10, 2014 at 3:56am

    It is a complete MYTH that businesses have a right to refuse service. Find me any civil rights legislation that includes such a right. Refusing service is called discrimination.

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  • [1] August 8, 2014 at 8:07am

    Your right to pray and the discrimination presented by discounting a product for performance of a religion gesture are two completely different things. No one is saying you can’t be silly, just that you don’t get preferential treatment for your superstitions.

    There is not even a vague threat of America becoming a Muslim nation under Sharia law. Even today in areas were there have been Muslim communities for several generations there are a growing number of former Muslims turned atheist.

    It’s all superstition.

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  • [1] August 8, 2014 at 7:59am

    Here’s how we see it; keep your superstitions at home or in your churches. We don’t want to see it, hear it or smell it. Where the conflicts really originates is when Believers seem to feel that their values should be society’s values and implement that through laws. You’ve done that for hundreds of years and that’s enough. We’re mad as that mythical place down below and we’re not going to take it anymore!! Yeah, we want to erase every visage of iconography from public spaces and silence the exhalations to your deities. We want to worship Nothing and the rise of the Nones in our society is proof that as we remove the public displays of religiousness, we make being a None easier for people.

    The latest Pew Research polls put Bible adherent, church-going Christians at around 25% of the general population, the Catholics claim 24% but about 50% of those are in name only and of the remaining half, only a minority are completely compliant with their rules and rites, let’s be generous and say 10% of the general population are devote Catholics. So we have 35% of Americans really going along with the complete mythology as true and inerrant. While once the ruling constituency, the drop in numbers has given a corresponding reduction in the power to inflict your delusions on society.

    Yes indeed, we are winning.

    Responses (3) +
  • August 8, 2014 at 7:35am

    A surcharge for credit card use is only “illegal” in 10 states but the Terms of Service agreements from all the Credit Card companies prohibit the practice. Convenience fees for alternative payment channels are allowed if it is a fixed amount not a percentage.

    Your work around suggestion is no different from what they are currently doing if that behavior-based incentive does in any manner included performance of a religious gesture. Restaurant discounts for bringing in the weekly church bulletin from the Sunday services has been successfully challenged.

  • [1] August 7, 2014 at 7:09am

    I did a year as a Teaching Assistant at Lewis & Clark when I was in grad school, great school. I am surprised that Reed didn’t rank highly as well.

    Regarding BYU’s Honor Code – The University of Virginia, my alum, has had a Code of Honor since 1842, Thomas Jefferson as Governor of VA founded the fist Honor Code at William & Mary in 1779. The BYU Honor Code is really an extension of the Mormon superstition as it cover manner of dress, sex and other behavior restrictions from that religion.

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  • [1] August 6, 2014 at 10:04pm

    All I can say is Lake Travis & Hippie Hollow, fantastic fun place.

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  • August 6, 2014 at 7:54am

    Removing inappropriate religious incursions into public taxpayer owned spaces is not in anyway incompatible with or in opposition to the social justice issues you cite. Nor does the miniscule amount spent on protecting America from the threat of creeping Theocracy impede the furtherance of the goals of ending hunger or bringing world peace.

  • [1] August 6, 2014 at 7:44am

    That is the Fair & Balance Treatment of the issue. NONE for everyone!
    OK, maybe make an acception for the Holy Book of Pasta as blessed by the Flying Spaghetti Monster but only because that is the one True path.

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