Aaron Rodgers Takes a Subtle Jab at Fellow Christian QB Russell Wilson With God Comment at Press Conference

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers took a thinly veiled jab at the Seahawk’s Russell Wilson during a press conference after his team’s 27-17 win over Seattle on Sunday night.

“I think God was a Packers fan tonight,” Rodgers told reporters. “He was taking care of us.”

Some context is required, however,

After the Seahawks defeated the Green Bay Packers in the NFC Championship last year, Wilson suggested God played a role in the outcome of the game.

“That’s God setting it up, to make it so dramatic, so rewarding, so special,” Wilson said after the game.

SEATTLE, WA - SEPTEMBER 15: Russell Wilson #3 of the Seattle Seahawks looks to throw the ball against the San Francisco 49ers during their game at Qwest Field on September 15, 2013 in Seattle, Washington. Credit: Getty Images
SEATTLE, WA – SEPTEMBER 15: Russell Wilson #3 of the Seattle Seahawks looks to throw the ball against the San Francisco 49ers during their game at Qwest Field on September 15, 2013 in Seattle, Washington. Credit: Getty Images

Rodgers pushed back when asked about the comment, telling ESPN that he doesn’t think “God cares a whole lot about the outcome.”

“He cares about the people involved, but I don’t think he’s a big football fan,” Rodgers said.

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers plays with the ball before an NFL football game, Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Tim Sharp)
Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers plays with the ball before an NFL football game, Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Tim Sharp)

The comment, likely meant to be a good natured jab in a relatively new rivalry between the Packers and Seahawks, will certainly make a potential 2015 playoff matchup even more interesting.

Rodgers, who is also a Christian, is less outspoken about his faith than Wilson. He previously told ESPN that he’s not an “over-the-top or an in-your-face kind of guy with my faith.”

“I would rather people have questions about why I act the way I act, whether they view it as positive or not, and ask questions, and then given an opportunity at some point, then you can talk about your faith a little bit,” he said.

(H/T: Huffington Post)