Black Lives Matter gets what it wants in Chicago — and crime is skyrocketing

Black Lives Matter gets what it wants in Chicago — and crime is skyrocketing
Demonstrators protest the fatal police shooting of Paul O'Neal Aug. 7 in Chicago, Illinois. (Joshua Lott/Getty Images)

Law enforcement advocate Heather MacDonald documented some new statistics in the New York Post that challenge the narrative coming from the Black Lives Matter movement.

Focusing on Chicago, America’s petri dish of liberal policies, MacDonald reveals that arrests and overall policing is in decline in the city:

Arrests are down 28 percent this year in the Windy City, the lowest since at least 2001, according to the Chicago Sun-Times, and less than half what they were in 2010. Drug arrests are down by half. Pedestrian stops were down 82 percent by early fall.

But rather than launching it into a new golden age of peace and prosperity, Chicago is experiencing a renaissance of crime:

So far this year, 4,334 people have been shot in Chicago: one person every two hours. Almost all the victims have been black. The police have shot 25 people, virtually all armed or otherwise dangerous — less than .6 percent of the total.

This is a drastic increase from last year, when 2,989 people were shot, and there were 492 homicides. Shootings have increased 45 percent over last year, and homicides have increased 56.5 percent, according to the Chicago Tribune. Less than 1 percent of the shootings have been by the police, and yet Black Lives Matter focuses on this minuscule number instead of the real threat to the black community represented by the rest of the 99.4 percent of shootings.

MacDonald says the real culprit is what academics and social justice groups have actually advocated as the solution to high crime rates: de-policing and the undoing of “broken window” policies that help deter greater crimes by targeting lesser criminals before they get a chance to expand their criminal activities.

She hopes that this will highlight the devastating consequences of de-policing to prevent other cities from implementing the policies that have caused so much misery in the beleaguered city of Chicago.

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