New poll reveals what the Roy Moore scandal has done to his chances of winning bid for Senate

New poll reveals what the Roy Moore scandal has done to his chances of winning bid for Senate
A new poll has revealed what a sexual assault scandal has done to Roy Moore's Senate campaign. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Roy Moore, the Republican nominee for a special election next month to fill a Senate seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, has been embroiled in a sexual abuse scandal for the last several days after a Washington Post story brought to light allegations from numerous women spanning back several decades. What the story has done to Moore’s chances of winning next month is just now being realized.

A new poll released over the weekend detailed just how much Moore is falling to Democratic opponent Doug Jones.

What does the poll show?

According to a new JMC Analytics survey, Moore now trails Jones by four points. The poll, which was conducted between Nov. 9 and Nov. 11, found that 46 percent of Alabamians surveyed would vote for Jones, while just 42 percent said they would vote for Moore.

Nine percent said they were undecided. However, among those undecided, 48 percent said they were leaning toward Jones while just 44 percent said they were leaning toward Moore.

Just 47 percent of respondents said they believe Moore is qualified to serve in the Senate while 43 percent said they think he is not. Concerning the sexual assault allegations, 38 percent said the allegations make them less likely to vote for Moore, while 29 percent said the allegations make them more likely to vote for Moore. Thirty-three percent said the allegations make no difference.

The majority of the respondents were Republican and older than 65.

How does this differ from before the allegations surfaced?

In the same survey, Moore previously had an eight point lead over his opponent. That means the sexual abuse allegations have caused a swing of at least 12 points.

Moore is also quickly losing the support of GOP senators. Sens. Mike Lee (Utah), Steve Daines (Mont.) and Bill Cassidy (La.) have pulled their endorsements of Moore. Meanwhile, the White House has said Moore should step down if the allegations are true.

Former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) have outright called on Moore to step down and resign.

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