Poll: Republicans see a dip in party affiliation

Poll: Republicans see a dip in party affiliation
An attendee displays an elephant ring — the symbol of the Republican Party — at the Republican National Convention in July 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. A Gallup poll says 37 percent of American adults said they either identify as Republicans or are independents who lean toward the Republican Party, a 5-point drop from 42 percent last year. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

The percentage of American adults who identify as Republican has dipped since President Donald Trump’s election last year, according to a new Gallup poll.

What did the poll find?

According to Gallup, 44 percent of American adults said they either identify as Democrats or are independents who lean toward the Democratic Party, the same percentage as in November 2016.

Meanwhile, 37 percent of American adults said they either identify as Republicans or are independents who lean toward the Republican Party, a 5-point drop from 42 percent last year.

What does it mean?

Gallup noted that the poll indicates Democrats are currently in a stronger position heading into the 2018 midterm elections, “but not because the Democratic base has increased.”

According to Gallup, Democrats have averaged a 5-point advantage over Republicans in the poll for the last 10 years. Republicans have not outranked Democrats in any month in the poll — but they did tie with Democrats in August 2010, as well as August and September 2015.

The percentage of those who identify as Republicans was lower just once before in the last decade: December 2008, shortly after President Barack Obama was elected.

The latest figures, from Gallup Daily tracking interviewing Nov. 1-30, are based on interviews with more than 14,000 U.S. adults.

68 Comments