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French President Pledges to 'Destroy the Army of Fanatics' Responsible for Paris Terror Attack

Faith

"We will not give in either to fear or to hate."

PARIS (TheBlaze/AP) -- Intoning the names of 130 dead, a subdued France paid homage Friday to those killed two weeks ago in the attacks that gripped Paris in fear and mourning, with President Francois Hollande making a defiant vow.

"We will not give in either to fear or to hate," he said during a ceremony at the Invalides, a 17th-century complex that is home to Napoleon's tomb, according to AFP. "To all of you, I solemnly promise that France will do everything to destroy the army of fanatics that committed these crimes."

Windows were draped with French flags in an uncharacteristic display of patriotism, but the locked-down courtyard ceremony at the Invalides national monument lacked the defiance of January, when a million people poured through the streets to honor those killed by Islamic extremist gunmen.

French President Francois Hollande stands in front of members of the French government, officials and guests during a ceremony in the courtyard of the Invalides in Paris, Friday, Nov. 27, 2015. France is mourning and honoring those killed in the Nov. 13 attacks in a somber ceremony presided by French President Francois Hollande. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Hollande was speaking to 2,600 dignitaries and others, including those injured during the attack earlier this month.

France's military provided the only images of Friday's ceremony, and no one without an invitation was permitted inside.

The night of Nov. 13, three teams of suicide bombers and gunmen struck across Paris, beginning at the national stadium — where Hollande was among the spectators — and ending in the storming of the Bataclan concert venue.

In all, 130 people died and hundreds were injured. The crowd at the stadium, as they filed outside that night, shakily sang France's national anthem - and the Marseillaise was again played on Friday.

Hollande entered the Invalides alone, and sat alone in a simple chair in front of the assembled crowd.

Wounded people in the Nov. 13 Paris attacks wait for the start of a ceremony in the courtyard of the Invalides in Paris, Friday, Nov. 27, 2015. France is mourning and honoring those killed in the Nov. 13 attacks in a somber ceremony presided by French President Francois Hollande. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

"One hundred and thirty destinies had been stolen," he said of the attacks. "One hundred and thirty laughs that will never be heard again."

Those killed were overwhelmingly in their 20s and 30s, young adults out on a mild Friday night of music, food, drinks or sports. The youngest was 17. The oldest, 68. The courtyard went silent after the reading of the names finished, broken finally by a mournful cello.

Hollande stared straight ahead.

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