John Kelly’s biggest pet peeve may change how President Trump operates

John Kelly’s biggest pet peeve may change how President Trump operates
New White House chief of staff John Kelly wants to implement a system so top aides aren't learning about major policy decisions on Twitter, along with the rest of the country. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Now that John Kelly has taken over as White House chief of staff, the former commanding general wants to put a halt to President Donald Trump’s tweeting sprees that have left aides scrambling.

According to officials in the West Wing, Kelly wants to change the White House’s organizational structure. He wants to limit who has access to the president, what ends up on his desk and who briefs him, Politico reported.

Kelly hopes that putting new policies and procedures in place will help eliminate blunders similar to the military transgender announcement that took place on Twitter.

White House and Defense Department lawyers had warned Trump about the potential legal backlash the administration would face if they made the announcement. The lawyers were convinced that the discussion could be tabled and discussions would continue down the road. That is until Trump made his announcement on Twitter and his team was left scrambling to develop a policy.

Although Kelly knows he can’t control what and when the president tweets, he can help steer the messaging in the “right direction” by limiting who has access to Trump, a White House official told Politico.

Kelly plans to implement a system so top aides aren’t learning about major policy decisions on Twitter, along with the rest of the country.

“You can’t have a president who gets up at 5 a.m. and tweets policy,” said Leon Panetta, a former chief of staff and a friend of Kelly’s, told Politico. “The best thing would be if the president stopped tweeting, but that’s not going to happen.”

According to Trump advisers, the president’s tweeting storms generally occur when he is frustrated with his staff or media coverage. He utilizes Twitter to set the record straight, especially when he fears a leak will occur.

A similar instance occurred with Kelly’s appointment. He knew the president was going to make him chief of staff but he had no idea the announcement would be made on Twitter. One senior White House official said they found out about Kelly’s appointment when their phone started ringing about the announcement.

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