Bernie Sanders bows out of Women’s March convention after backlash from activists

Bernie Sanders bows out of Women’s March convention after backlash from activists
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) has bowed out of a scheduled appearance at The Women’s Convention Oct. 27-29 in Detroit after backlash from activists. Instead, Sanders said he will visit Puerto Rico to see recovery efforts. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) bowed out of a scheduled appearance at The Women’s Convention after backlash from activists, according to USA Today.

Why were activists upset?

Some attendees of the convention, organized by the Women’s March, objected to the group inviting Sanders to headline the event, which is scheduled Oct. 27-29 in Detroit.

Tamika Mallory, co-founder of Women’s March, told USA Today earlier this month that Sanders is a “powerful” ally on “progressive issues, women’s issues, mobilizing millennials.

“He is really in line with the principles of the Women’s March,” Mallory said.

Some activists argued that a woman should headline the event, or objected to Sanders’ inclusion at the convention because he challenged former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in the 2016 Democratic presidential primary.

In a statement earlier this week, a spokesperson for the Women’s March said Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) will open the first evening of the convention.

The spokesperson acknowledged that “our announcement gave the impression that [Sanders] is occupying a central role at the convention” but said “it is important to correct the record: Senator Sanders is not opening or headlining the Women’s Convention.”

What did Sanders say?

In a statement provided to USA Today, Sanders said he will visit Puerto Rico to see recovery efforts instead.

“Given the emergency situation in Puerto Rico, I will be traveling there to visit with San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz and other officials to determine the best way forward to deal with the devastation the island is experiencing,” Sanders said. “The U.S. Congress cannot turn its back on the millions of people in Puerto Rico who, four weeks after the hurricane, are still without electricity, food and running water.”

67 Comments