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Clear Video of Flaming Plane Crash in Siberian River

It was carrying 36 people.

New video has gone viral of a Antonov-24 Russian passenger plane that was forced to make an emergency landing on water in Eastern Siberia Monday. The pilot had reported difficulties and decided to attempt landing the 36-year-old flaming aircraft on the River Ob. The plane was carrying 36 people, and can clearly be seen with one of its engines a blaze. The crash resulted in seven deaths with two additional survivors in critical condition, and eighteen passengers still in the hospital. The majority of the passengers were able to escape while the plane stayed afloat in the cold waters.

Relatives of those killed in the crash will receive $35,500 in compensation per family, and those seriously injured will get about $10,600 each.

Along with last month's Tupolev jet crash killing 44 and the sinking of a cruise ship holding more than 200 on board  Sunday, concerns have been raised in regards to the safety of Russia's aging transportation industry. New York Times:

"On Monday, Russia’s president, Dmitri A. Medvedev, recommended grounding all Tupelev-134s and Antonov-24s currently in use in the Russian civilian fleet. Pending an investigation, he said, the crew involved in Monday’s crash should be commended for minimizing casualties 'under very difficult flying conditions.'

The Antonov-24, a mid-size twin engine propeller plane, was first built in the 1960s and is still widely used in the countries of the former Soviet Union and other poorer countries, despite its abysmal safety record. There have been 1,971 recorded fatalities in 134 accidents since the plane began commercial flights, according to the Aviation Safety Network."

Note to self, fly American.

One last thing…
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