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Report: Obama Admin to Release E-mails on CIA's Libya Talking Points to Senate Intelligence Committee

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"Terms like Al Qaeda were stripped out..."

FILE - On this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012 file photo, a man looks at documents at the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens. The graffiti reads, "no God but God," " God is great," and "Muhammad is the Prophet." After more than two months, Libya s investigation into the attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi appears in limbo. Key security commanders and witnesses say they were never questioned. No suspects have been named, and gunmen who were seen participating in the assault walk freely in the eastern Libyan city. Hanging over the probe is a fear of reprisals from powerful extremist militiamen. Credit: AP

Amid continued controversy over the Sept. 11 terror attack in Benghazi, Libya, the Obama administration has reportedly agreed to provide e-mails surrounding the contentious CIA talking points that led to the distribution of seemingly-inaccurate information. It's likely that there will be an investigation using this new content to explore whether the White House hid key details about the deadly assault.

A congressional source has told Fox News that the e-mails will be provided early next week to the Senate Intelligence Committee following requests to review the messaging in question. What is not yet clear, however, is whether hard copies of the e-mails will be offered or whether members will read the messages on a computer or digital platform. Fox News has more:

The source noted that the committee has already seen details on how the controversial talking points were changed from their original drafting. Terms like Al Qaeda were stripped out, which led Republican lawmakers to charge the talking points were deliberately watered down -- it’s unclear which versions of the talking points members of the Senate committee might see.

The intelligence community’s talking points were provided to U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice and formed the basis of her controversial comments on all the major Sunday talk shows five days after the attack. During those shows, she asserted that the attack was a “spontaneous” reaction to protests elsewhere in the region and was a demonstration that spun out of control.

The potential release of these e-mails comes as the White House is attempting to nominate counter-terrorism adviser John Brennan to direct the CIA.

(H/T: Fox News)

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