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Day without a woman' strike is being organized by team made up entirely of men

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CHICAGO, IL - MARCH 07: Demonstrators protest to support International Women's Day and against the administration of President Donald Trump on March 7, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. The demonstrators have vowed to protest in Chicago every Tuesday for the first 100 days of the Trump administration. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

The strike being organized to coexist with 2017's International Women's Day is finding itself lacking of female inclusion according to The Washington Free Beacon.

The group Action Network Fund is a "progressive online organizing platform" based in Washington, D.C., that is primarily concerned with mobilizing protests against President Donald Trump, and works with all sorts of union and left-wing politically based organizations to do it.

The Action Network has partnered with major progressive groups, including the AFL-CIO and National Education Association. The group touts its partnership with Indivisible, a group that provides a "practical guide for resisting the Trump agenda." The group manages lists of volunteers and supporters for the Town Hall Project, a protest group founded by a former Hillary Clinton campaign staffer that encourages people to show up at town halls and protest for progressive policies. The Action Network promotes Women's March events, posting maps to help activists locate marches in their area. It also has organized protests against Wal-Mart.

The Action Network shares the same Washington, D.C. address as Change to Win, an SEIU and Teamsters-affiliated labor group. Change to Win is chaired by James P. Hoffa, the president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. Its secretary is Mary Kay Henry, the president of the SEIU.

With its organizational capabilities, Action Network Fund decided to lend their services in helping organize women who were looking to skip work, and have a "Day Without a Woman" demonstration.

However, the Action Network Fund is staffed by  males: Mark Fleischman, Brian Young, Douglas Land, Jason Rosenbaum and Jeffrey Dugas.

In effect, women are marching to protest the working conditions of women who they claim are the underdogs in a male-lead environment, being lead by men who have hired no women employees to work amongst them.

The Beacon reports that Women's March spokeswoman Cassady Fendlay did not respond to requests for comment about why organizers are working with an all male progressive group.

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