Mich. State accused of billing teen for appointment at which she was sexually abused

Mich. State accused of billing teen for appointment at which she was sexually abused
Former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar wipes a tear as he listens to Carrie Hogan deliver a victim impact statement at his sentencing hearing on Jan. 17 in Lansing, Michigan. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

A 15-year-old girl who was sexually abused by former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar was billed by Michigan State University for the appointments — even after the abuse was uncovered, the girl revealed in court Monday.

What happened?

Nassar had a sports medicine practice at Michigan State University. That’s where Emma Ann Miller alleges she was abused just a week before the university suspended him in 2016 for allegations of abuse from other gymnasts.

“MSU billed me for those appointments,” Miller said, addressing Nassar face-to-face in court. “My mom is still getting billed for appointments where I was sexually assaulted.”

How did Michigan State respond?

After Miller’s testimony, a Michigan State spokesperson quickly addressed the accusation.

“I can tell you that patients of former MSU physician Larry Nassar will not be billed,” he said to The Associated Press.

‘I wish I’d never met him’

Miller, one of nearly 100 accusers to testify during Nassar’s sentencing hearing, said Nassar has known her since birth and abused her on a monthly basis for five years.

“There has never been a time in my life when I did not know Larry Nassar,” Miller said. “But now I wish I’d never met him.

“Larry Nassar, I hate you,” she continued.

What did they know?

The fallout from Nassar’s years of sexual abuse won’t end with his sentencing. While he will likely spend the rest of his life in prison on child pornography and sexual abuse convictions, now Michigan State is facing legal pressure.

Questions about what Michigan State officials knew about Nassar while he was employed at the school have led to civil lawsuits.

“Are you listening, MSU? I’m 15 years old and I’m not afraid of you, nor will I ever be,” Miller said. “At 15, I shouldn’t know the inside of a courtroom, but I’m going to become real comfortable in one. So should you.

“This is not over,” Miller said. “See, your honor, we are just getting started.”