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Louisville federal buildings boarded up as city braces for decision on whether cops will face charges for Breonna Taylor's death

Preparing for the worst?

Members of NFAC hold up their firearms before a march on July 25 in Louisville, Kentucky. The group is marching in response to the killing of Breonna Taylor. (Photo by Brett Carlsen/Getty Images)

With a decision on whether or not to charge the police officers involved in Breonna Taylor's killing anticipated this week, some federal buildings have been boarded up and in-person hearings have gone remote in Louisville, Fox News reported.

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron will present the findings from the Taylor investigation to a grand jury this week and after that is expected to make an announcement about the fate of the three officers who executed a no-knock warrant on Taylor's home in March and fatally shot her.

The federal courthouse downtown and the offices attached to the courthouse have had the windows boarded up. The courthouse will be closed to the public Monday through Friday, and scheduled in-person hearings will be conducted as video conferences.

Fox News reported that there was not an official reason given for the changes, but an unnamed official shed some light on the situation:

The order did not give a reason for the temporary closure but said it came at the request of the General Services Administration, which manages the buildings. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Office in Louisville will be closed Sept. 21-25 "due to a court order," according to the agency's website.

An unnamed courthouse official told the Louisville Courier-Journal that the buildings would be closed this week in anticipation of a major announcement, but did not elaborate.

City and federal properties have been targeted by rioters in various cities over the past several months in response to police violence against minorities, including Taylor. A federal courthouse in Portland, for example, has been repeatedly vandalized by protesters during a streak of more than 100 straight days of protests.

The city of Louisville paid a $12 million settlement to Taylor's family last week as part of a civil lawsuit over her killing.

Taylor was killed March 13 when officers broke into her home on a warrant that was part of a drug investigation after midnight. After Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, fired at the plainclothes officers upon entry, officers returned fire, hitting Taylor five times.

Walker, a legal gun owner, said he didn't know the officers were law enforcement when he shot at them. He was initially charged with attempted murder of a police officer after hitting one of them in the leg, but the charges were later dropped. Walker has sued the city of Louisville for compensatory damages and to protect himself from being arrested again in connection with the incident.

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