Try BlazeTV for Free
Faith

Atheists Call for 'Booing, Public Mockery and Ridicule' of Prayer

In the wake of the Supreme Court's Greece v. Galloway decision on prayer, the anti-Christian Freedom From Religion Foundation is calling on atheists to employ disruptive, Alinskyite tactics during any public Christian prayer.

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com

In an unhinged response to Monday’s Supreme Court decision in Greece v. Galloway – which reaffirmed Americans’ First Amendment right to public prayer, to include sectarian prayer – the always entertaining Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) has announced its retaliatory “path forward” for Christ-haters.

Saul Alinsky would be proud.

On its website, the Christophobic FFRF, headquarter in Madison, Wisconsin, posted a member essay calling the High Court’s decision, “disastrous for state-church separation,” and frantically warned, “This decision could be the equivalent of Dred Scott or Plessy for our [anti-Christian] cause.”

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com  Photo credit: Shutterstock.com

The Supreme Court’s infamous Dred Scott and Plessy v. Ferguson decisions, of course, upheld slavery and racial segregation respectively. This is richly ironic considering that groups like the FFRF, the ACLU, People for the American Way and others, are simply anti-Christian segregationist organizations that exist for the sole purpose of segregating Christians and Christianity from any public forum.

“In light of yesterday’s dreadful ruling, we, and all activists, will have to fight harder and smarter,” declared the screed. “We will need to lodge more complaints, write more letters, conduct more protests, and bring more lawsuits. No matter how long it takes, Greece v. Galloway must be overturned.”

The essay brazenly called for “mockery” of God, summoning atheists to infiltrate any public forum that might open in prayer, and to then “voice disapproval…by booing, making thumbs down gestures, blowing a raspberry, or by making other audible sounds signifying disapproval. …”

David Silverman, president of American Atheists, stands on a Ten Commandments and says why he thinks it shouldn't be there after Eric Hovind (not pictured), with Creation Today, stood on the new Atheist bench and preached his beliefs during the unveiling of an Atheist monument outside the Bradford County Courthouse on Saturday, June 29, 2013 in Stark, Fla. The New Jersey-based group American Atheists unveiled the 1,500-bound granite bench Saturday as a counter to the religious monument in what's called a free speech zone. Group leaders say they believe it's the first such atheist monument on government property. About 200 people attended the event. Credit: AP David Silverman, president of American Atheists, stands on a Ten Commandments and says why he thinks it shouldn't be there after Eric Hovind (not pictured), with Creation Today, stood on the new Atheist bench and preached his beliefs during the unveiling of an Atheist monument outside the Bradford County Courthouse on Saturday, June 29, 2013 in Stark, Fla. The New Jersey-based group American Atheists unveiled the 1,500-bound granite bench Saturday as a counter to the religious monument in what's called a free speech zone. Group leaders say they believe it's the first such atheist monument on government property. About 200 people attended the event. Credit: AP

“Citizens may also abruptly walk out of government proceedings and then make an auspicious re-entry as soon as the prayer has ended,” suggested the group.

The stated goal? “Public mockery and ridicule” of Jesus Christ and all Christians.

The FFRF post concluded:

"If after the above actions have been taken, the government continues to insult atheists and/or religious minorities with sectarian prayers, activists may turn to public mockery and ridicule. One example is the 'prayer mockery hat.' Activist can easily make a brightly colored hat with large ear muffs and dark sunglasses. Wording on the cap could say: 'I OBJECT TO PRAYER!' Then, as soon as the pastor or chaplain has been introduced, activists can put on their 'prayer mockery hat' with exaggeration and then remain seated throughout the prayer, completely ignoring the pastor until finished. Activists can also mount a small GoPro-style camera to their cap to record the response for posting on Facebook or Youtube.com.

"In spite of the disastrous ruling, the fight is not over. We must not submit to this subjugation of our constitutional right to be free FROM unwanted religious intrusion by government. Indeed, 'Nothing Fails Like Prayer.'"

Still think there’s no left-wing war on Christianity?

Think again.

Matt Barber is founder and editor-in chief of BarbWire.com. He’s an attorney concentrating in constitutional law and serves as Vice President of Liberty Counsel Action.

TheBlaze contributor channel supports an open discourse on a range of views. The opinions expressed in this channel are solely those of each individual author.

One last thing…
Watch TheBlaze live and on demand on any device, anywhere, anytime.
try premium
Exclusive video
All Videos
Watch BlazeTV on your favorite device, anytime, anywhere.
Try BlazeTV for Free
Sponsored content
Daily News Highlights

Get the news that matters most delivered directly to your inbox.