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Political Affiliations of the Millennials Are Up For Grabs

As the 2016 election approaches, both parties will fight for political loyalties that will define the next three decades.

"I VOTED" stickers lie on a table in the Norton Shores Library in Norton Shores, Mich, Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, running as the state's fix-it man, sought re-election to a second term Tuesday against Democratic challenger Mark Schauer, who repeatedly told voters that the Republican incumbent's policies have left average folks behind. (AP Photo/The Muskegon Chronicle, Tommy Martino)

There is a unique uncertainty overshadowing the political landscape these days – an anomaly that few are willing to discuss.

As the 2016 presidential election inches closer, social media is oddly quieter than usual when it comes to possible candidates. The millennial generation, ever so eager to share their opinion, suddenly lacks one to voice.

As the generation’s charismatic leader, President Barack Obama, prepares to leave office, one thing has quickly become evident – the political alliances of millennials are officially up for grabs.

"I VOTED" stickers lie on a table in the Norton Shores Library in Norton Shores, Mich, Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, running as the state's fix-it man, sought re-election to a second term Tuesday against Democratic challenger Mark Schauer, who repeatedly told voters that the Republican incumbent's policies have left average folks behind. (AP Photo/The Muskegon Chronicle, Tommy Martino)  (AP Photo/The Muskegon Chronicle, Tommy Martino)

For the past seven years, millennials have been passionately steadfast in their support of marriage equality. That passion coincided with the Democrat Party platform, immediately giving supporters of marriage equality a political party to support.

Make no mistake, for the majority of millennials, social issues such as the legalization of gay marriage and (to a lesser extent) abortions are the strongest attachments they have with the Democrat Party. Now that gay marriage is legal in every state, many are now left apathetic towards the political landscape without any direct loyalty to the Democrat Party.

Aside from the support of gay marriage, millennials are all across the board when it comes to their views. Don’t believe me? Take a look at what a recent Reason Foundation poll found among millennials:

  • They desire small government so long as budget cuts don’t directly impact them.
  • They loathe political parties, but give Congress higher approval ratings than any other generation.
  • They overwhelmingly supported Obama’s promise of universal health care, yet greatly oppose Obamacare.
  • They want the government to fix their problems, but they don’t want Washington to be in charge.

Confused by those results? So are the leaders of political parties – thus the lack of a push to actively engage the generation. Not only that, but neither party has found a candidate they believe they can successfully sell to millennials.

So how can one party lock down the majority of millennials?

It comes down to one thing, really – start a conversation. Millennials want to be a part of something, from gay marriage to the World Cup. Surprisingly, it is the Republican Party that, when completely stripped to its bare bones, has exactly what millennials want to rally behind…

Their personal freedom.

While the past eight years saw a push to tax the wealthy and “redistribute the wealth,” it is amazing to see that the millennial generation feels otherwise. Don’t misconstrue that statement; this generation will gladly rally around a movement to raise money to help those in need, but they don’t want to be told how and where to do so.

Don’t let the media fool you - millennials desire freedom to pursue their passions, start their own companies or simply to enjoy life without Washington telling them what to do. They like their wealth, and they want to do with it as they desire.

They don’t want the government telling them how to spend their money.

They don’t want the government telling them who they can marry.

They don’t want the government telling them how they are to use their bodies.

They don’t want the government to control them, they want freedom.

Take away the topic of gay marriage and the pro-life/pro-choice debate, and millennials desire exactly what is at the heart of the GOP – limited government.

The political affiliations of the millennial generation are officially up for grabs. If the Republican Party can learn how to successfully create a conversation centered around limited government, 2016’s political landscape may quickly become more red than any of us could anticipate.

TheBlaze contributor channel supports an open discourse on a range of views. The opinions expressed in this channel are solely those of each individual author.

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