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Meet the Controversial German Imam Accused of Brutally Beating His Wife & Pushing Sharia Law

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"an extreme brand of Islam that preaches hatred of Christians and Jews."

CBN News' Erick Stakelbeck (also a TheBlaze TV contributor) knows a thing or two about terrorism. The reporter and host has spent a plethora of time interviewing key figures and delving into the troubling international threat that continues to grow.

In a new report, Stakelbeck claims that Germany is facing a new radical threat -- the rise of Salafism, a movement he calls "an extreme brand of Islam that preaches hatred of Christians and Jews." The reporter provides some context as to the problems that have been occurring in the nation of late:

In June, 1,000 police fanned out across Germany. They targeted the homes, schools, and mosques of Salafi Muslims.

Salafis model themselves after Islam's prophet, Mohammed, and his followers and strictly follow Islamic sharia law.

Their ideology encourages violent jihad and is shared by al Qaeda and many other Islamic terror groups. It's now taking hold among a small but growing number of Germany's 4.3 million Muslims.

"We have a really dynamic growing Salafi scene," German journalist Franz Feyder said. "Some of the security officers tell us that we have about 5,000 Salafis in Germany."

Feyder follows Germany's Salafi scene closely.

"The Salafi movement in Germany is creating an environment for violence and radicalization," he told CBN News. "Not every Salafist is a terrorist, but every terrorist is a Salafist."

In a recent interview accompanying the report, Stakelbeck also sat down with Sheikh Abu Adam, an Islamic leader who runs the Darul Quran Mosque in Munich. Adam dislikes the "Salafi" term and told the reporter that he simply prefers to be called a "Muslim." While he strikes a tone of moderation, local officials believe that something more sinister may be at play -- and they've visited his mosque to investigate.

While German authorities dub Adam's mosque as potentially problematic, he claims, in contrast, that he has helped fight against terrorism. His congregants, too, have reportedly done the same. When asked why he's being targeted despite his alleged counter-terrorism work, Adam told Stakelbeck that he simply doesn't understand the charges being waged against him.

"I don't know," he said. "All of my students, all -- I don't have any exception -- they are fighting against terrorism and they are very integrated in the society. All of them are very kind, loving people. They laugh. They communicate with all people."

Despite the faith leader's denial, Stakelbeck provides some problematic details about his background:

Yet the sheikh has engaged in violence of his own.

In 2010, he made international headlines when he was accused of brutally beating one of his wives [he has three], breaking her nose and shoulder.

He reportedly yelled Koranic verses during the attack and refused to let police enter the apartment. The wife would not press charges.

Also last year, a German television crew filmed Adam presiding over sharia courts in his mosque that operate outside of German law.

Watch Stakelbeck's fascinating interview with the controversial Islamic leader, below:

(H/T: CBN News)

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