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Wild Bobcat That Viciously Attacked MA Family Was Rabid

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"This is completely out of character for a bobcat..."

Roger Mundell Jr., bears cuts on his face at his home in Brookfield, Mass., Monday, Jan. 7, 2013, after being attacked by a bobcat in his garage Sunday. The cat ran out of the garage and bit Mundell's 15-year-old nephew on the arms and back before it was shot dead. (AP Photo/The Telegram & Gazette, Christine Peterson)

It's official: The bobcat that attacked a Massachusetts man and his nephew on Sunday had rabies. Earlier this week, we told you about Roger Mundell Jr.'s shocking story -- you know, the one in which the wild animal, which worked its way into his garage, subsequently attacked the unsuspecting family. Now, it has been confirmed that the bobcat was, indeed, inflicted with the deadly virus.

The Telegram & Gazette reports that state lab results on the dead animal were announced at Tuesday night's select board meeting in Brookfield. Wildlife officials had already suspected that the bobcat was rabid, because of its unusually-aggressive behavior; the tests merely confirmed their suspicions. 

Roger Mundell Jr., bears cuts on his face at his home in Brookfield, Mass., Monday, Jan. 7, 2013, after being attacked by a bobcat in his garage Sunday. The cat ran out of the garage and bit Mundell's 15-year-old nephew on the arms and back before it was shot dead. (AP Photo/The Telegram & Gazette, Christine Peterson)

"This is completely out of character for a bobcat, even to be in the garage in the first place,” said Tom French, assistant director for the state Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, prior to the release of test results. "It is completely consistent with an animal that may have rabies."

After pouncing on Mundell, 53, sinking its teeth into his face and its claws in his back and holding him in what he described as a bear hug, the animal went outside and bit his 15-year-old nephew.

Watch Mundell describe the terrifying incident, below:

Luckily, the family was able to pin the animal down, then shoot and kill it with a Smith & Wesson Bodyguard 380 before it did any more harm.

Based on recommendations from health care providers, all three individuals commenced rabies treatments immediately following the encounter -- so exposure to the animal is, at this point, of no health concern.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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