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White House Finally Speaks Out on Attacks Against Christians in Egypt

"We have condemned in unambiguous terms all of the violence that has been perpetrated there in Egypt."

A picture taken on August 18, 2013 shows the Amir Tadros coptic Church in Minya, some 250 kms south of Cairo, which was set ablaze on August 14, 2013. Egypt's Christians are living in fear after a string of attacks against churches, businesses and homes they say were carried out by angry supporters of ousted Islamist president Mohamed Morsi. As police dispersed Morsi supporters from two Cairo squares on August 14, attackers torched churches across the country in an apparent response. Credit: AFP/Getty Images

Following reports that more than 60 Christian churches have been attacked in Egypt, the White House condemned the violence against the Coptic Christians after several days of denouncing violence by the military-run government against supporters and members of the Muslim Brotherhood.

The Amir Tadros coptic church in Minya, Egypt was set ablaze on August 14, 2013. Egypt's Christians are living in fear after a string of attacks against churches, businesses and homes they say were carried out by angry supporters of ousted Islamist president Mohamed Morsi. (Getty Images)

“We have condemned in unambiguous terms all of the violence that has been perpetrated there in Egypt,” White House spokesman Josh Earnest told reporters Wednesday. “We have been concerned and condemned the violence that was perpetrated by the government against peaceful protestors and we're just as outraged and just as concerned about reports that Christian churches have been targeted.”

The response was an answer to a question from Fox News reporter Ed Henry. On Monday, USA Radio Network reporter Connie Lawn asked Earnest a similar question during the White House press briefing, but Earnest ignored the question.

“The violence in Egypt should come to an end,” Earnest said Wednesday. “It needs to stop and that is the way we are going to facilitate reconciliation that will allow the interim government to make good on their promise, to transition back to a democratically elected civilian government. We need to see an inclusive process get started there.

Several news reports throughout Egypt surfaced not only about churches being burned, but one report of Islamists capturing three nuns and marching them down the street like prisoners.

Egypt's transitional military government has cracked down on supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi demonstrating in the streets. While Christians are a minority, reportedly making up about 10 percent of Egypt's population, it was one of many key demographics who pushed the popular demonstration for the ouster of Morsi on July 3, one year after his election. The Associated Press reported that Morsi supporters complained that Christians played a disproportional large role in the days of mass rallies demanding Morsi resign from office.

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