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Nurse Flown to Switzerland After Child With Ebola Bit Him

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In this Sept. 19, 2014 photo, an Ebola virus health care worker takes a rest outside a Ebola isolation unit in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Sierra Leone confined its 6 million people to their homes Friday for the next three days as the Ebola-ravaged West African country began what was believed to be the most sweeping lockdown against disease since the Middle Ages. (AP Photo/Michael Duff)

GENEVA (TheBlaze/AP) — A Swiss nurse has joined the ranks of health workers evacuated from West Africa as a precaution for possible Ebola virus disease infection. The means by which this man came in contact with the bodily fluids of an infected patient though is what's unusual: He was bitten.

The Swiss health ministry said the unidentified man was working for an international organization in Sierra Leone when he was bitten by a child infected with Ebola on Saturday. It is unlikely he was infected though, the ministry said, because he was wearing protective gear.

Still, he's being kept for observation for three weeks during the incubation period at Geneva's University Hospital.

This was the first time an Ebola patient was flown to Switzerland.

In other news, Ebola news:

  • Flood of patients: A day after it opened, more than 100 possible patients flocked to Liberia's new treatment center for the disease, some of whom are not yet confirmed to have the disease that causes hemorrhagic fever. By Monday, 46 people were after test results came back positive. The others are being held for observation or are receiving treatment for other diseases at the 150-bed center. 

Patients arrive on September 21, 2014 at the "Island Clinic", a new Ebola treatment centre that opened in Monrovia. Liberia announced plans on September 21 for a four-fold increase in beds for Ebola patients in its overwhelmed capital Monrovia, as US troops arrived to help tackle the deadly epidemic. The announcement came two weeks after the World Health Organization (WHO) warned that the country, worst-hit in the regional outbreak, with more than 1,450 deaths, would soon face thousands of new cases. (ZOOM DOSSO/AFP/Getty Images) Patients arrive on September 21, 2014 at the "Island Clinic", a new Ebola treatment centre that opened in Monrovia. Liberia announced plans on September 21 for a four-fold increase in beds for Ebola patients in its overwhelmed capital Monrovia, as US troops arrived to help tackle the deadly epidemic. The announcement came two weeks after the World Health Organization (WHO) warned that the country, worst-hit in the regional outbreak, with more than 1,450 deaths, would soon face thousands of new cases. (ZOOM DOSSO/AFP/Getty Images)

  • More soldiers being sent? Germany's defense minister asked for volunteers from the country's military to staff a clinic it plans to set up in West Africa. In a memo circulated Monday, Ursula von der Leyen appealed to soldiers and civilian employees to "voluntarily make yourselves available for this unusual mission." If there were an emergency, he said volunteers "can rely on being brought back to Germany." The Obama administration pledged to send more than 3,000 U.S. military members to help with the Ebola epidemic last week.

Police guard a roadblock as Sierra Leone government enforces a three day lock down on movement of all people in an attempt to fight the Ebola virus, in Freetown, Sierra Leone, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Thousands of health workers began knocking on doors across Sierra Leone on Friday in search of hidden Ebola cases with the entire West African nation locked down in their homes for three days in an unprecedented effort to combat the deadly disease. (AP/ Michael Duff) Police guard a roadblock as Sierra Leone government enforces a three day lock down on movement of all people in an attempt to fight the Ebola virus, in Freetown, Sierra Leone, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Thousands of health workers began knocking on doors across Sierra Leone on Friday in search of hidden Ebola cases with the entire West African nation locked down in their homes for three days in an unprecedented effort to combat the deadly disease. (AP/ Michael Duff)

  • No bans? The World Health Organization said Monday that there shouldn't be generalized travel or trade bans to countries impacted by the outbreak. The idea is to avoid anything that might get in the way of aid efforts. "Flight cancellations and other travel restrictions continue to isolate affected countries, resulting in detrimental economic consequences, and hinder relief and response efforts risking further international spread," a WHO statement said, according to Reuters. "The Committee strongly reiterated that there should be no general ban on international travel or trade..."

According to the latest numbers, more than 5,800 people have been infected in West Africa. Of those, more than 2,800 have died.

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