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How Controversial Comedian Russell Brand Responded to a 9/11 Conspiracy Question

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"Do you believe that the twin towers were destroyed by forces of the American government or similar?"

Controversial comedian Russell Brand speaks on BBC's NewsNight October 23, 2014. (Photo: BBC)

Controversial comedian Russell Brand — who recently appeared on Russia Today with Alec Baldwin to bash the United States for being a racist, sexist nation — said Thursday that people must be "open-minded" about all possibilities when it comes to the 9/11 attacks.

The comedian was on the BBC's "Newsnight" Thursday when he was asked: "In [your] book, you refer to the destruction of the twin towers in New York, 9/11, as what some people say looked like a controlled explosion. One might read that as you giving some credence to conspiracy theories."

"You can read the book in whatever manner you would like to," Brand responded, sitting in front of a stylized photo of himself as Che Guevara.

Controversial comedian Russell Brand speaks on BBC's NewsNight October 23, 2014. (Photo: BBC) Controversial comedian Russell Brand speaks on the BBC's "Newsnight," Oct. 23, 2014. (Image source: BBC)

"Do you believe that the twin towers were destroyed by forces of the American government or similar?" host Evan Davis pressed.

Brand once again did not give a straight answer: "I think it is interesting that at this time where we have so little trust in our political figures, where ordinary people have so little trust in their media, that we have to remain open-minded to any kind of possibility. ... Do you trust the American government? Do you trust the British government?"

"My views aren't really important to this point," Davis said. "But I think most people regard it as ridiculous to suggest anything other than that Al Qaeda destroyed those buildings."

Brand once again did not commit to an answer.

"What I do think is very interesting is the relationship that the Bush family have had for a long time with the bin Laden family," he said. "What I do think is interesting is the way that even the BBC reports events in Ottawa to subtly build an anti-Islamic narrative. I think that's very interesting."

The host once again gave Brand a way out, and this time he took it: "But you're not suggesting the Bush family were involved in the destruction of 9/11?"

"I don't want to talk about daft conspiracy theories here on 'Newsnight,' mate," Brand said.

Watch video from the interview, below (relevant comments around 11:20):

(H/T: Mediaite)

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