Get BlazeTV
News

Give Me the Money': Homeless Man Robbed a Bank but It's What He Did Afterward That Might Seem Unusual

"Some people don't have any other alternative."

Rodney Cameron attempted to rob a bank Tuesday but then sat outside in order to be arrested. He told police he was tired of living on the street. (Image source: WKMG-TV)

"This is a bank robbery. I need 5-100s 5-50s 10-20s. Give me the money."

That's what was written on a note a Florida man handed a bank teller this week, according to WKMG-TV. But it's not your typical bank robbery. On the note, the man also revealed his plans for afterward.

"I will sit outside until the police show up," the note continued.

Rodney Cameron attempted to rob a bank Tuesday but then sat outside in order to be arrested. He told police he was tired of living on the street. (Image source: WKMG-TV) Rodney Cameron attempted to rob a bank Tuesday but then sat outside in order to be arrested. He told police he was tired of living on the street. (Image source: WKMG-TV)

And he wasn't kidding.

Rodney Cameron sat outside the Orlando Bank United until police arrived. Why?

"I am tired of the street life and want a warm place to stay," the 58-year-old said, according to WKMG.

Watch WKMG-TV's report:

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player

Lt. Lovetta Quinn-Henry with the Orlando Police Department told the news station that people committing crimes to escape the cold is "very common," though usually they're less serious offenses than robbing a bank. Earlier this week while snow was being dumped on some northern states, temperatures in Florida dropped below freezing in some counties.

Lasonya Caldwell, who stays at a Florida homeless shelter where Cameron had been seen before, told WKMG his actions were "extreme" and "sad," but she added that "some people don't have any other alternative."

Homeless committing smaller crimes just to go to jail for shelter and a consistent meal is something seen around the country (see here, here, here and here).

According to an article last month on the website AlterNet, Salt Lake City about a decade ago found it was spending $20,000 per year, on average, for each homeless resident. Up to $40 million a year was spent in 2005 on arrests, time spent in jail, emergencies and shelters. Then, AlterNet reported, the city tried a program that allowed them to spend less than $8,000 on each person, giving them an apartment and other case services. By 2013, the program had helped reduce chronic homelessness by more than 70 percent and city spending on the issue dropped to $9.6 million.

One last thing…
Watch TheBlaze live and on demand on any device, anywhere, anytime.
try premium
Exclusive video
All Videos
Watch BlazeTV on your favorite device, anytime, anywhere.
Subscribe Now
Recommended
Daily News Highlights

Get the news that matters most delivered directly to your inbox.