© 2024 Blaze Media LLC. All rights reserved.
What Archaeologists Found Under the Floors of an Abandoned Jerusalem Building Could Be the Site of One of the Biggest Events in Jesus' Life

What Archaeologists Found Under the Floors of an Abandoned Jerusalem Building Could Be the Site of One of the Biggest Events in Jesus' Life

"Everything — archaeological, historical and gospel accounts — all falls into place and makes sense."

When archaeologists began digging below an abandoned building in Jerusalem’s Old City 15 years ago as part of an effort to expand a museum there, they likely had no idea what they were about to stumble upon.

There, underneath the floor, they uncovered what's left of the suspected palace where Jesus' trial might have taken place before his crucifixion — a monumental event that is recounted in the New Testament, according to the Washington Post.

Prior to digging, researchers knew that the location had housed an old prison used by the Ottoman Empire, but finding what they believe to be Herod the Great's palace was a surprise.

Archaeologists made the stunning find while preparing to expand the Tower of David Museum, which provides exhibits documenting Jerusalem's history.

"During the archaeological excavations that took place there over the last decade a 'timeline' of Jerusalem was discovered – finds from the First Temple Period, the remains of Herod’s palace and tanneries and dying pools from the Middle Ages," reads a description on the Tower of David website.

Years after it was first uncovered, the site is finally being shown to museum visitors, though debate over where Christ's trial was actually been held continues. While many experts agree that the palace would have been in this area, not everyone believes that it is the location that is referenced in the Bible.

The overarching debate centers on the "praetorium" — a Latin word mentioned in Matthew, Mark, John and Acts that references a general's tent. While some experts believe that Pilate, the Roman governor who judged Jesus, would have had his praetorium inside of a local military barracks, some say that it would have been inside of the palace, the Post reported.

University of North Carolina at Charlotte archaeology professor Shimon Gibson is among those who believe that Jesus' trial unfolded inside or near the palace, citing details about the surroundings in the book of John that he believes mirror what's been uncovered at the site.

"There is, of course, no inscription stating it happened here, but everything — archaeological, historical and gospel accounts — all falls into place and makes sense," he told the Post.

Read more about the finding here.

(H/T: Washington Post)

--

Front page image via Shutterstock.com

Want to leave a tip?

We answer to you. Help keep our content free of advertisers and big tech censorship by leaving a tip today.
Want to join the conversation?
Already a subscriber?