Watch LIVE

Journalist Asks Marco Rubio If He'd Ever Attend a Gay Wedding and Here's His Answer

Media

"If people want to change the definition of marriage they should petition their state legislature."

Sen. Marco Rubio R-Fla., gestures as he speaks during the Values Voter Summit, held by the Family Research Council Action, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, in Washington. Credit: AP

Republican senator and 2016 presidential candidate Marco Rubio has made it clear that he's a supporter of traditional marriage, though he said during an interview on Wednesday that he would have no problem attending a friend or loved one's gay wedding.

"If there’s somebody that I love that’s in my life, I don’t necessarily have to agree with their decisions or the decisions they’ve made to continue to love them and participate in important events," Rubio told journalist Jorge Ramos during an appearance on "America."

When Ramos sought a firmer answer to the question, Rubio again made it clear that he would have no problem attending a same-sex ceremony.

"If it’s somebody in my life that I care for, of course I would," the GOP presidential candidate said. "I’m not going to hurt them simply because I disagree with a choice they’ve made or because I disagree with a decision they’ve made, or whatever it may be."

Rubio added, "Ultimately, if someone that you care for and is part of your family has decided to move in one direction or another or feels that way because of who they love, you respect that because you love them."

Watch Rubio's response below:

He also said that he believes that citizens live in a free society and that people who wish to change the definition of marriage should go through the proper channels to do so.

"If people want to change the definition of marriage they should petition their state legislature, and they can have that debate in the political arena," he said. "Who I don't think should be redefining marriage is the court system."

Rubio, a Catholic, likened attending a gay wedding with going to a divorced individual's second wedding, which can end up running afoul of Catholic theology if the conclusion of the first marriage was not handled in accordance with church teaching.

(H/T: Mediaite)

Most recent
All Articles