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This Celestial Event Is About to Cause a Major Traffic Jam in New York City

"a unique urban phenomenon in the world, if not the universe."

Image source: Twitter

Crosstown traffic on several New York City streets is expected to be gridlocked as people stand in the middle of the street, hoping to grab a photo of the solar event known as Manhattanhenge.

This weekend's solar event was dubbed Manhattanhenge years ago by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson.

Tyson was referring to the four times each year when the sun aligns with the city's street grids and the skyscrapers on each side of create the perfect frame for some dramatic photos.

Calling it "a unique urban phenomenon in the world, if not the universe," Tyson has helped draw additional attention to event. The increased interest will likely have crosstown streets (the east and west-facing roads) packed with people.

Of course, the wider streets — those with two lanes of traffic in each direction (14th, 23rd, 34th, 42nd and 57th) — provide the most desired views of the sun. Additionally, if you're looking to include an iconic NYC landmark in your photo, it is suggested you stand on 34th Street to include the Empire State Building and on 42nd Street to get the Chrysler Building in your shot.

If you're in the area and interested in seeing Manhattanhenge in person, the half-sun event happens at 8:12 pm on Friday night. For a full sun shot, you need to be ready to snap your picture at 8:12 on Saturday night.

Veteran photographers will likely be setting up about 30 minutes before the sun hits the perfect spot.

The only thing that could prevent Manhattanhenge from being seen: cloudy weather. Fortunately, the forecast appears to be cooperating:

Image source: weather.com


Follow Mike Opelka (@Stuntbrain) on Twitter.

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