Supreme Court holds private meeting to discuss Trump’s appeal on DACA decision

Supreme Court holds private meeting to discuss Trump’s appeal on DACA decision
U.S. Supreme Court considers intervening in DACA. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court privately discussed on Friday how to handle President Donald Trump’s appeal of a judge’s decision to block his plan to end protections for so-called Dreamers, Yahoo News reported.

A decision on whether the nine justices will take up the case could come as early as Tuesday, the report stated.

The Trump administration is appealing a Jan. 9 ruling by U.S. District Judge William Alsup that stopped the president’s order to end DACA. The program protects young adults who entered the country illegally. It also provides them with permits and other benefits.

Why is this happening?

Lawmakers have been unable to agree on DACA, and their last attempt at legislation on the matter failed in the Senate on Thursday. Former President Barack Obama implemented DACA in 2012.

If the Supreme Court hears the appeal by the Trump administration, a ruling would not likely happen until late June, Yahoo News reported. If they reject the appeal, Alsup’s nation-wide injunction against the president’s plan will stand as other legal challenges to Trump’s action move forward.

What happens in the meantime?

Trump’s order would cause DACA to be phased out March 5. But the injunction, if it remains in place, would allow DACA beneficiaries to reapply for protections, Yahoo News reported.

A second U.S. judge on Tuesday issued a similar injunction that orders the Trump administration to retain DACA.

Democrats and some Republicans have vigorously pushed to protect the Dreamers.

Trump’s move to end DACA led to legal challenges from Democratic state attorneys, and other organizations and individuals, Yahoo News stated. Trump’s administration maintains that Obama overreached his power by bypassing Congress when establishing DACA.

The president has backed legislation to give dreamers citizenship but also cuts back on legal immigration.

DACA allowed about 700,000 young adults receive protections for two years. After that time, they must reapply.

About 1.8 million people are eligible for DACA, according to the report.