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First female soldier completes Army Special Forces initial selection process

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A female soldier has passed the initial Special Forces Assessment and Selection process for the first time since the U.S. Army opened it up to women in 2016. It can take one to two years to complete the process required to be part of the Special Forces. (Image source: Video screenshot)

A woman soldier has for the first time completed the U.S. Army Special Forces Assessment and Selection process, Army Times reported.

Several females have attempted the 24-day program since the Army opened its special operation jobs to women in 2016, but until now none had made it to the next level.

“Recently, a female successfully completed Special Forces Assessment and Selection and was selected to attend the Special Forces Qualification Course," Lt. Col. Loren Bymer told Army Times. ”We’re proud of all the candidates who attended and were selected to continue into the qualification course in hopes of earning their Green Beret."

The name and rank of the soldier have not been released.

“It is our policy to not release the names of our service members because Special Forces soldiers perform discrete missions upon graduation,” Bymer said.

What happens next?

There are four phases to the qualifications course, which is known as Q course.

Special Forces candidates typically take a break from training before moving to the second step of the Q course.

Captains may attend career training and specialists would attend basic leader training during the break.

It can take one to two years to complete the process required to be part of the Special Forces.

What else?

The Green Berets are among the last to not have women assigned to their Army communities, according to the report.

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