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Former MSNBC host lashes out at Condoleezza Rice over 'offensive and disgusting' appearance on 'The View': 'Soldier for white supremacy'

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Touré Neblett, former MSNBC host, journalist, and podcaster, took former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to task over her recent appearance on "The View," in which she argued against critical race theory.

During the appearance, Rice said that critical race theory should not be taught in public schools.

What are the details?

In a fiery editorial on the Grio, Neblett accused Rice of being a "foot soldier for white supremacy."

Neblett wrote, "Condoleezza Rice's recent appearance on The View was offensive and disgusting for many reasons but she was who we thought she was: a soldier for white supremacy. Her thoughts on Critical Race Theory are completely white centric, as in, they revolve around the thoughts and needs of white people."

During her appearance, Rice said that the theory should not be taught in schools, and people should not attach and shame, guilt, or stigma to the color of their skin.

"I come out of an academic institution, and this is something that academics debate, what is the role of race and so forth," Rice said during the discussion.

"And let me be very clear, I grew up in segregated Birmingham, Alabama, I couldn't go to a movie theater or to a restaurant with my parents. I went to segregated schools until we moved to Denver," she added.

"My parents never thought that I was going to grow up in a world without prejudice, but they also told me, 'That's somebody's else's problem not yours, you're going to overcome it, and you are going to be anything you want to be,'" she continued.

"That's the message that I think we ought to be sending to kids," the former secretary of state insisted.

Elsewhere during her interview, Rice said that white people should not feel guilt about their race or their history, nor should black people feel "disempowered" by race.

"I would like black kids to be completely empowered, to know that they are beautiful in their blackness, but in order to do that, I don't have to make white kids feel bad for being white," she added.

What else did Neblett say?

The onetime cable host added that educators should not whitewash U.S. history in order to "protect the feelings of white children."

"[W]hat about the feelings of black children?" he continued. "What would their feelings be if they knew they were being taught a version of American history that was distorted to protect white kids? What message does that send to them?"

He also argued that white children — and adults — should "absolutely feel bad about the past atrocities committed by white Americans."

"They should feel guilty," Neblett insisted. "They should cringe at what their ancestors did. They should also understand that modern white power is directly related to those atrocities. ... American history is a series of cycles where white people grow more powerful because of the legalized oppression of black people. American history is a series of stories where white people knock us down and stand on our necks and then ask why we're on the ground. If we don't know history we don't understand reality and how it was constructed. I really don't care if learning this makes white kids feel bad — and if it doesn't then they are too heartless."

He concluded, "Our classrooms should not be another example of white privilege, they should reflect the ugly reality of American history. But really the whole discussion is bizarre — we are debating about whether we should teach our children real American history or if we should lie to them and protect their fragile white hearts. I cannot accept a country that contorts itself to avoid causing white pain. I'm not here to help comfort white people. And Lord knows I am never, ever going to center them."

Critical Race Theory Targeted in Virginia Gov. Race | The View www.youtube.com

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